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Arduino 4 relays sheild
The Arduino 4 Relays Shield allows your Arduino driving high power loads. The Arduino 4 Relays Shield is a solution for driving high power loads that cannot be controlled by Arduino's digital IOs, due to the current and voltage limits of the controller. The Shield features four relays, each relay provides 2 pole changeover contacts (NO and NC); in order to increase the current limit of each output the 2 changeover contacts have been put in parallel. Four LEDs indicate the on/off state of each relay. Features Thinker Kit interface 2x TWI, 2x OUT, 2x IN Interfaces with Arduino Board DIO Relays 4 (60W) General Operating Voltage 5 V Current needs 140 mA (with all releays on, about 35 mA each) PCB Size 53 x 68.5 mm Product Code A000110 Description Operating Voltage 5V Coil current consumption 140 mA (with all releays on, about 35 mA each) Single pole chargeover contact maximum current @ 30 V DC 2A Maximum load voltage 48 V Maximum switching capacity 60 W Power The shield doesn't need external power: it will be provided by the base board, through the 5V and 3.3V pins of the Arduino board used as base. Input and Output The relays are controlled by the following Arduino board pins: Relay 1 = Arduino pin 4 Relay 2 = Arduino pin 7 Relay 3 = Arduino pin 8 Relay 4 = Arduino pin 12 The shield features several TinkerKit input/output and communication interfaces. Connecting TinkerKit modules can simplify the creation of a project or a prototype. The on-board connectors are : 2 TinkerKit Inputs: IN2 and IN3 (in white), these connectors are routed to the Arduino A2 and A3 analog input pins. 2 TinkerKit Outputs: OUT5 and OUT6 (in orange), these connectors are routed to the Arduino PWM outputs on pins 5 and 6. 2 TinkerKit TWI: these connectors (4-pin in white) are routed on the Arduino TWI interface. Both connect to the same TWI interface to allow you to create a chain of TWI devices. Physical Characteristics The maximum length and width of the 4 Relays Shield PCB are 2.7 and 2.1 inches respectively. Four screw holes allow the Shield to be attached to a surface or case. Note that the distance between digital pins 7 and 8 is 160 mil (0.16"), not an even multiple of the 100 mil spacing of the other pins. Compatible Boards The shield is compatible with all the Arduino boards, 5V and also 3.3V standards.  

₹2,419.00*
ARDUINO CTC 101 PROGRAM - FULL
ARDUINO CTC 101 PROGRAM - FULL
CTC 101 is a modular STEAM program consisting of a toolbox with more than 25 projects and easy to assemble experiments, an online platform, and guided educators support.   Creative Technologies in the Classroom 101, or CTC 101, is Arduino’s one-of-a-kind STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) program. Tailored for students ages 13 to 17, CTC 101 is the ideal professional development program for educators.CTC 101 has been certified by the Finnish Kokoa Education Standard™ that guarantees high educational value and robust pedagogical design on global learning. If you are interested in the CTC 101 program and want to know more about it, please scroll down and sign up for one of our webinars in English, Spanish or Italian. What Does It Include? TOOLBOX: More than 700 components for a class with up to 30 students. ONLINE PLATFORM: Access to the Arduino Education Learning Management System with step-by-step instructions and lessons for more than 25 hands-on experiments based on themed modules. SUPPORT: Guided educators training, live webinars, and forum monitored by Arduino Education experts. CTC 101 Toolbox   More than 700 components and parts: Six Arduino 101 boards: one of the most powerful Arduino boards for Education, it includes wireless communication (Bluetooth) and an integrated IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit). They are programmable, able to read inputs (e.g., light on a sensor) and capable to control outputs (e.g., activating a motor). Six Arduino Education shields: add-on boards that connect to the Arduino 101 and UNO boards to extend their functionality. The Education Shield is a custom-made shield designed by Arduino Education specially tailored for educational purposes to enable quick and easy learning while building projects. More than 10 mini breadboards: used to make circuits easier to build. They can be either attached on top of the Education Shield or used separately to connect other components. Set of electronic components: used to create interactive electronic circuits, includes resistors, potentiometers, LEDs, push buttons, capacitors, and diodes. Set of plug and play modules: sensors and actuators that include the necessary components onboard so they can be connected to the Education shield board directly. Modules include a joystick, light and tilt sensors, and an infrared array. Set of sensors and actuators: sensors include light, knock, touch / capacitive, and infrared. Actuators include, standard and continuous servo motors. Set of batteries: includes both 9 V and 1.5 V batteries, and 4-slot and 8-slot battery holders. Media and storage: includes webcam, SD-card and a speaker. The Education Shield has an SD card reader and an audio connector. Set of cables: include all the cables needed such as USB cables, jumper wires, module cables, battery snaps, alligator cables and single core wires. MDF parts: project building involves laser-cut MDF parts. There are more than 10 different projects that can be built with this set of parts. Storage and sorting boxes: electronic components can be sorted inside boxes according to their functions and sizes. After MDF parts are removed from their frames, they can be stored in the resealable storage bags to keep them organized for later. The sorting box with dividers can be used to organize small components. Online Platform   Each CTC 101 purchase includes user access to the online platform. Up to 3 educators are granted access, subsequently they will manage student access with a 30 slot limit per toolbox. See demo here.   The online platform runs on an custom-made Learning Management System (LMS), this platform helps students get started with programming, electronics and build fully-functional, interactive projects with the guidance of educators. Currently available in English, Spanish, Italian and Catalan.   Educators are granted access before students so they can prepare and adapt their lesson plans with more engaging and creative techniques so that they take full advantage of the latest technologies to integrate them into their curriculum.   The content and class dynamics are specially designed to enhance the students’ problem-solving and teamwork skills in a collaborative environment.   Student Activities   Module 1: programming and basic coding. Module 2: introduces Arduino boards and digital signals. Module 3: introduces analog signals and serial communication. Module 4: introduces robotics, power systems and motors. Module 5: introduces wireless communication via Bluetooth and advanced sensors. Reference section: extra material and exercises for troubleshooting and further learning. Educators section: self-administered online training, materials for class preparation, teacher guides and resources.   By the end of the course, the students will have the possibility to prepare and create their own projects and share them with the Arduino Education community. * Note that CTC 101 program duration is flexible and based on the amount of lessons the students take per week (two to three lessons per week are recommended). The core content (student learning activities) can take up to 10 weeks to complete while the complete program (with the addition of student projects) can take up to 20 weeks.

₹230,769.00*
Arduino CTC Go! - Motions Expansion Pack
Arduino CTC Go! - Motions Expansion Pack
If you’ve taken your students through the CTC GO! - Core Module, the Motions Expansion Pack will build on what they have already learned about how to use technology as a tool and how to apply that knowledge in the real world. The Motions Expansion Pack challenges them to go a step further in computing and design and technology by introducing them to new and more complex programming concepts that develop their logical reasoning, computational thinking, and problem-solving skills. Students will expand on their knowledge and skills in STEAM subjects to learn about motions by adding mobility to the hands-on, playful projects and transforming the movement their motors provide. As an educator, you’ll still get all the teaching support you need with webinars, videos, guides, and direct contact with an expert.  What Does Every Module Include? TOOLBOX: All the specific motions components and materials you need to build several guided experiments and projects in addition to the Core Module components. SOFTWARE PLATFORM FOR EDUCATORS with all the materials you need for each lesson, resources to help you with lesson preparation, content tips, timing suggestions for classroom management, and curriculum links SOFTWARE PLATFORM FOR PUPILS with step-by-step instructions, assembly videos, and fun activities to help them get started with programming, electronics and building fully-functional, interactive projects (educators also have prior access to this platform so they can prepare and adapt their lesson plans) TRAINING AND SUPPORT including a welcome training webinar with an Arduino Education expert, training videos that explain each lesson’s concepts, shorter videos that expand on lesson content, and direct email support from an education expert.  This expansion pack includes 14 learning sessions:  - 7 Guided sessions: 4 Guided activities lessons to learn how to start working with motors and 3 Guided project-building sessions to apply the acquired knowledge- 7 Self-guided project-building sessions During these sessions students will develop and build their own projectsThe seven self-guided project-building sessions that follow give students the confidence they need to work both under their own initiative and collaboratively with their peers, boosting their essential 21st-century skills As in the core module, the expansion pack includes teacher content, teacher guides and premium training and support with an Arduino Education expert. Age group 14 - 17 Students Up to 24 Teachers Up to 3 CTC GO! - Motions Expansion Pack Toolbox  8 Standard Servo Motors 8 Continuous Servo Motors 8 Student group boxes: Each student group will have a components box with the materials they need to add to the CTC GO! Core Module ones to work on the experimental lessons. 16 Li-on 18650 batteries 8 battery holders 2 battery chargers 8 9V batteries Jumper wires Two markers Two screwdrivers Assembly mechanical pieces: Include the modular building pieces needed to be combined with the already existing in the Core Module to be able to build 4 different guided projects.

₹109,559.00*
Arduino Due - Original Made in Italy
Arduino Due - Original Made in Italy
The Arduino Due is the first Arduino board based on a 32-bit ARM core microcontroller. With 54 digital input/output pins, 12 analog inputs, it is the perfect board for powerful larger scale Arduino projects. The Arduino Due is a microcontroller board based on the Atmel SAM3X8E ARM Cortex-M3 CPU. It is the first Arduino board based on a 32-bit ARM core microcontroller. It has 54 digital input/output pins (of which 12 can be used as PWM outputs), 12 analog inputs, 4 UARTs (hardware serial ports), a 84 MHz clock, an USB OTG capable connection, 2 DAC (digital to analog), 2 TWI, a power jack, an SPI header, a JTAG header, a reset button and an erase button.   Warning: Unlike most Arduino boards, the Arduino Due board runs at 3.3V. The maximum voltage that the I/O pins can tolerate is 3.3V. Applying voltages higher than 3.3V to any I/O pin could damage the board.   The board contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a micro-USB cable or power it with a AC-to-DC adapter or battery to get started. The Due is compatible with all Arduino shields that work at 3.3V and are compliant with the 1.0 Arduino pinout.   The Due follows the 1.0 pinout:   TWI: SDA and SCL pins that are near to the AREF pin. IOREF: allows an attached shield with the proper configuration to adapt to the voltage provided by the board. This enables shield compatibility with a 3.3V board like the Due and AVR-based boards which operate at 5V. An unconnected pin, reserved for future use.   You can find your board warranty information here.   Getting Started In the Getting Started section, you can find all the information you need to configure your board, use the Arduino Software (IDE), and start to tinker with coding and electronics. Specification Microcontroller AT91SAM3X8E Operating Voltage 3.3V Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12V Input Voltage (limits) 6-16V Digital I/O Pins 54 (of which 12 provide PWM output) Analog Input Pins 12 Analog Output Pins 2 (DAC) Total DC Output Current on all I/O lines 130 mA DC Current for 3.3V Pin 800 mA DC Current for 5V Pin 800 mA Flash Memory 512 KB all available for the user applications SRAM 96 KB (two banks: 64KB and 32KB) Clock Speed 84 MHz Length 101.52 mm Width 53.3 mm Weight 36 g Documentation OSH: Schematics  Arduino Due is open-source hardware! You can build your own board using the following files:  EAGLE FILES IN .ZIPSCHEMATICS IN .PDF   Power The Arduino Due can be powered via the USB connector or with an external power supply. The power source is selected automatically. External (non-USB) power can come either from an AC-to-DC adapter (wall-wart) or battery. The adapter can be connected by plugging a 2.1mm center-positive plug into the board's power jack. Leads from a battery can be inserted in the Gnd and Vin pin headers of the POWER connector. The board can operate on an external supply of 6 to 20 volts. If supplied with less than 7V, however, the 5V pin may supply less than five volts and the board may be unstable. If using more than 12V, the voltage regulator may overheat and damage the board. The recommended range is 7 to 12 volts.  The power pins are as follows: Vin. The input voltage to the Arduino board when it's using an external power source (as opposed to 5 volts from the USB connection or other regulated power source). You can supply voltage through this pin, or if supplying voltage via the power jack, access it through this pin. 5V.This pin outputs a regulated 5V from the regulator on the board. The board can be supplied with power either from the DC power jack (7 - 12V), the USB connector (5V), or the VIN pin of the board (7-12V). Supplying voltage via the 5V or 3.3V pins bypasses the regulator, and can damage your board. We don't advise it. 3V3. A 3.3 volt supply generated by the on-board regulator. Maximum current draw is 800 mA. This regulator also provides the power supply to the SAM3X microcontroller. GND. Ground pins. IOREF. This pin on the Arduino board provides the voltage reference with which the microcontroller operates. A properly configured shield can read the IOREF pin voltage and select the appropriate power source or enable voltage translators on the outputs for working with the 5V or 3.3V.   Memory The SAM3X has 512 KB (2 blocks of 256 KB) of flash memory for storing code. The bootloader is preburned in factory from Atmel and is stored in a dedicated ROM memory. The available SRAM is 96 KB in two contiguous bank of 64 KB and 32 KB. All the available memory (Flash, RAM and ROM) can be accessed directly as a flat addressing space.  It is possible to erase the Flash memory of the SAM3X with the onboard erase button. This will remove the currently loaded sketch from the MCU. To erase, press and hold the Erase button for a few seconds while the board is powered.   Input and Output Digital I/O: pins from 0 to 53 Each of the 54 digital pins on the Due can be used as an input or output, using pinMode(),digitalWrite(), and digitalRead() functions. They operate at 3.3 volts. Each pin can provide (source) a current of 3 mA or 15 mA, depending on the pin, or receive (sink) a current of 6 mA or 9 mA, depending on the pin. They also have an internal pull-up resistor (disconnected by default) of 100 KOhm. In addition, some pins have specialized functions: Serial: 0 (RX) and 1 (TX) Serial 1: 19 (RX) and 18 (TX) Serial 2: 17 (RX) and 16 (TX) Serial 3: 15 (RX) and 14 (TX)  Used to receive (RX) and transmit (TX) TTL serial data (with 3.3 V level). Pins 0 and 1 are connected to the corresponding pins of the ATmega16U2 USB-to-TTL Serial chip. PWM: Pins 2 to 13  Provide 8-bit PWM output with the analogWrite() function. the resolution of the PWM can be changed with the analogWriteResolution() function. SPI: SPI header (ICSP header on other Arduino boards)  These pins support SPI communication using the SPI library. The SPI pins are broken out on the central 6-pin header, which is physically compatible with the Uno, Leonardo and Mega2560. The SPI header can be used only to communicate with other SPI devices, not for programming the SAM3X with the In-Circuit-Serial-Programming technique. The SPI of the Due has also advanced features that can be used with the Extended SPI methods for Due. CAN: CANRX and CANTX These pins support the CAN communication protocol but are not not yet supported by Arduino APIs. "L" LED: 13  There is a built-in LED connected to digital pin 13. When the pin is HIGH, the LED is on, when the pin is LOW, it's off. It is also possible to dim the LED because the digital pin 13 is also a PWM output. TWI 1: 20 (SDA) and 21 (SCL) TWI 2: SDA1 and SCL1.  Support TWI communication using the Wire library. SDA1 and SCL1 can be controlled using the Wire1 class provided by the Wire library. While SDA and SCL have internal pullup resistors, SDA1 and SCL1 have not. Adding two pullup resistor on SDA1 and SCL1 lines is required for using Wire1. Analog Inputs: pins from A0 to A11  The Due has 12 analog inputs, each of which can provide 12 bits of resolution (i.e. 4096 different values). By default, the resolution of the readings is set at 10 bits, for compatibility with other Arduino boards. It is possible to change the resolution of the ADC withanalogReadResolution(). The Due’s analog inputs pins measure from ground to a maximum value of 3.3V. Applying more than 3.3V on the Due’s pins will damage the SAM3X chip. The analogReference() function is ignored on the Due.   The AREF pin is connected to the SAM3X analog reference pin through a resistor bridge. To use the AREF pin, resistor BR1 must be desoldered from the PCB.   DAC1 and DAC2  These pins provides true analog outputs with 12-bits resolution (4096 levels) with theanalogWrite() function. These pins can be used to create an audio output using the Audio library.   Please note that DAC output range is actually from 0.55 V to 2.75 V only. Other pins on the board: AREF  Reference voltage for the analog inputs. Used with analogReference(). Reset  Bring this line LOW to reset the microcontroller. Typically used to add a reset button to shields which block the one on the board. See also the mapping between Arduino pins and SAM3X ports:   PIN MAPPING SAM3X  Communication The Arduino Due has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino or other microcontrollers, and different devices like phones, tablets, cameras and so on. The SAM3X provides one hardware UART and three hardware USARTs for TTL (3.3V) serial communication.  The Programming port is connected to an ATmega16U2, which provides a virtual COM port to software on a connected computer (To recognize the device, Windows machines will need a .inf file, but OSX and Linux machines will recognize the board as a COM port automatically). The 16U2 is also connected to the SAM3X hardware UART. Serial on pins RX0 and TX0 provides Serial-to-USB communication for programming the board through the ATmega16U2 microcontroller. The Arduino software includes a serial monitor which allows simple textual data to be sent to and from the board. The RX and TX LEDs on the board will flash when data is being transmitted via the ATmega16U2 chip and USB connection to the computer (but not for serial communication on pins 0 and 1). The Native USB port is connected to the SAM3X. It allows for serial (CDC) communication over USB. This provides a serial connection to the Serial Monitor or other applications on your computer. It also enables the Due to emulate a USB mouse or keyboard to an attached computer. To use these features, see the Mouse and Keyboard library reference pages.  The Native USB port can also act as a USB host for connected peripherals such as mice, keyboards, and smartphones. To use these features, see the USBHost reference pages. The SAM3X also supports TWI and SPI communication. The Arduino software includes a Wire library to simplify use of the TWI bus; see the documentation for details. For SPI communication, use the SPI library.   Programming  The Due can be programmed with the Arduino Arduino Software (IDE). For details, see thereference and tutorials. Uploading sketches to the SAM3X is different than the AVR microcontrollers found in other Arduino boards because the flash memory needs to be erased before being re-programmed. Upload to the chip is managed by ROM on the SAM3X, which is run only when the chip's flash memory is empty.     Either of the USB ports can be used for programming the board, though it is recommended to use the Programming port due to the way the erasing of the chip is handled : Programming port: To use this port, select "Arduino Due (ProgrammingPort)" as your board in the Arduino IDE. Connect the Due's programming port (the one closest to the DC power jack) to your computer. The programming port uses the 16U2 as a USB-to-serial chip connected to the first UART of the SAM3X (RX0 and TX0). The 16U2 has two pins connected to the Reset and Erase pins of the SAM3X. Opening and closing the Programming port connected at 1200bps triggers a “hard erase” procedure of the SAM3X chip, activating the Erase and Reset pins on the SAM3X before communicating with the UART. This is the recommended port for programming the Due. It is more reliable than the "soft erase" that occurs on the Native port, and it should work even if the main MCU has crashed. Native port: To use this port, select "Arduino Due (NativeUSBPort)" as your board in the Arduino IDE. The Native USB port is connected directly to the SAM3X. Connect the Due's Native USB port (the one closest to the reset button) to your computer. Opening and closing the Native port at 1200bps triggers a 'soft erase' procedure: the flash memory is erased and the board is restarted with the bootloader. If the MCU crashed for some reason it is likely that the soft erase procedure won't work as this procedure happens entirely in software on the SAM3X. Opening and closing the native port at a different baudrate will not reset the SAM3X.   Unlike other Arduino boards which use avrdude for uploading, the Due relies on bossac.The ATmega16U2 firmware source code is available in the Arduino repository. You can use the ISP header with an external programmer (overwriting the DFU bootloader). See this user-contributed tutorial for more information.   USB Overcurrent Protection  The Arduino Due has a resettable polyfuse that protects your computer's USB ports from shorts and overcurrent. Although most computers provide their own internal protection, the fuse provides an extra layer of protection. If more than 500 mA is applied to the USB port, the fuse will automatically break the connection until the short or overload is removed.   Physical Characteristics and Shield Compatibility The maximum length and width of the Arduino Due PCB are 4 and 2.1 inches respectively, with the USB connectors and power jack extending beyond the former dimension. Three screw holes allow the board to be attached to a surface or case. Note that the distance between digital pins 7 and 8 is 160 mil (0.16"), not an even multiple of the 100 mil spacing of the other pins.   The Arduino Due is designed to be compatible with most shields designed for the Uno, Diecimila or Duemilanove. Digital pins 0 to 13 (and the adjacent AREF and GND pins), analog inputs 0 to 5, the power header, and "ICSP" (SPI) header are all in equivalent locations. Further the main UART (serial port) is located on the same pins (0 and 1). Please note that I2C is not located on the same pins on the Due (20 and 21) as the Duemilanove / Diecimila (analog inputs 4 and 5).

₹3,549.00*
Arduino Engineering Kit Rev2
The Arduino Engineering Kit Rev 2 provides extensive learning outcomes, giving students a strong understanding of basic engineering concepts through fun projects that create a collaborative learning environment. Students are able to connect what they learn with real-world industries, are encouraged to think critically, and improve their depth of knowledge by learning through experimentation. Ideal for advanced high school and college students. The Arduino Engineering Kit Rev 2 is a versatile, hands-on learning tool that demonstrates key control systems concepts, core aspects of mechatronics, and MATLAB and Simulink programming. The projects cover the basics of model-based design, control systems, image processing, robotics, signal processing, and more - plus they’re fun to do! The kit includes all the physical components you need, including learning materials and software, to build the three projects: a self-balancing motorcycle, a webcam controlled rover, and a drawing robot. There’s online step-by-step guidance, so it’s ideal for students working in small groups or for facilitating remote learning.  The kit is primarily for three types of users: students learning about mechatronics engineering, professors looking for practical resources to support their class, and makers with an interest or background in robotics, either professionally or as a hobby.  Adapting the kit and further experimentation Educators can freely tailor the Arduino Engineering Kit Rev2 to their students´needs and their own curriculum. You can use this versatile kit as the core of a new engineering mechatronics class or freely adapt the content to your own ideas and experiments while implementing MATLAB and Simulink, for example as part of laboratories and final projects  Opportunity for lots of experimentation for both educators and students. In addition to the three projects, students have the freedom to experiment, design, and develop new solutions using the software and hardware components in the kit, which are some of the tools that are used in industry and help students learn valuable career skills they’ll use in the future. Students can also buy the kit and use it to experiment at home and for extended learning. The kit includes: Several customized parts, a complete set of electronics, and all the mechanical components needed to assemble each project (a webcam controlled  rover, a self-balancing motorcycle, and a drawing robot):  - Arduino Nano 33 IoT- Nano Motor Carrier with IMU and battery charger- Three sets of mechanical pieces to assemble the projects- Li Ion 18650 battery- Two geared motors with encoders- DC motor with encoders- Servo motor- USB cable- Two whiteboard markers- Two wheels- Allen key- Webcam- Nylon thread- Screws, nuts, and bolts A hard plastic, stackable toolbox ideal for storage and years of use A one-year individual license for MATLAB and Simulink Student e-learning platform with step-by-step guidance

₹24,399.00*
Arduino Ethernet Shield 2
Description:   The Arduino Ethernet Shield 2 allows an Arduino Board to connect to the Internet. It is based on the Wiznet W5500 Ethernet chip. The Wiznet W5500 provides a network (IP) stack capable of both TCP and UDP. It supports up to eight simultaneous socket connections. Use the Ethernet library to write sketches that connect to the Internet using the Shield. The Ethernet Shield 2 connects to an Arduino Board using long wire-wrap headers extending through the Shield. This keeps the pin layout intact and allows another Shield to be stacked on top of it. There is an on board micro-SD card slot, which can be used to store files for serving over the network. It is compatible with the Arduino Uno and Mega (using the Ethernet library). The on board micro-SD card reader is accessible through the SD Library. When working with this library, SS is on Pin 4. The original revision of the Shield contained a full-size SD card slot; this is not supported. The shield also includes a reset controller, to ensure that the W5500 Ethernet module is properly reset on power-up. Previous revisions of the Shield were not compatible with the Mega and needed to be manually reset after power-up. The most recent revision of the board exposes the 1.0 pinout on rev 3 of the Arduino UNO Board. The Ethernet Shield 2 has a standard RJ-45 connection, with an integrated line transformer and Power over Ethernet enabled. This shield also features several TinkerKit input/output and communication interfaces that can be found on the topside of the board. Features: Operating voltage 5V (supplied from the Arduino Board) Ethernet Controller: W5500 with internal 32K buffer 2x TinkerKit Inputs, Outputs, and TWI Pins Each Connection speed: 10/100Mb Connection with Arduino on SPI port Documents: Schematic Eagle Files Ethernet2 Library Datasheet (W5500) Download Page Product Page Product Video

₹2,599.00*
Arduino Industrial 101
Arduino Industrial 101
Arduino Industrial 101 is an Evaluation board for Arduino 101 LGA module. The ATmega32u4 microcontroller is integrated in the baseboard. The module supports a Linux distribution based on OpenWRT named LininoOS. The board has built-in WiFi (IEEE 802.11b/g/n operations up to 150Mbps 1x1 2.4 GHz),  3 GPIOs (of which 2 can be used as PWM Outputs), 4 Analog Inputs, 1 USB, 1 Ethernet signal on pin headers and a built-in DC/DC converter. Check out the assembling guide and simply connect your board to a computer with a micro USB cable to get started. NB: In some countries, it is prohibited to sell WiFi enabled devices without  government approval. While waiting for proper certification, some local distributors are disabling WiFi functionality. Check with your dealer before purchasing a Industrial 101 if you believe you may live in such a country. ARDUINO MICROPROCESSOR Processor Atheros AR9331 Architecture MIPS Operating Voltage 3.3 V Flash Memory 16 MB RAM 64 MB DDR2 Clock Speed 400 MHz WiFi 802.11 b/g/n 2.4 GHz Ethernet 802.3 10/100 Mbit/s (Exported on headers) USB 2.0 Host (Exported on headers) ARDUINO MICROCONTROLLER Microcontroller ATmega32u4 Architecture AVR Operating Voltage 5 V Flash memory 32 KB SRAM 2.5 KB Clock Speed 16 MHz Analog I/O Pins 12 (4 exported on header) EEPROM 1 KB DC Current per I/O Pins 40 mA Power It is recommended to power the board via the micro-USB connection with 5VDC. If you are powering the board though the Vin pin, you must supply a regulated 5VDC. There is no on-board voltage regulator for higher voltages, which will damage the board. The power pins are as follows: VIN. The input voltage to the Arduino board. Unlike other Arduino boards, if you are going to provide power to the board through this pin, you must provide a regulated 5V. 5V. The power supply used to power the microcontrollers and other components on the board. This can come either from VIN or be supplied by USB. 3V3. A 3.3 volt supply generated by the on-board regulator. Maximum current draw is 50 mA. GND. Ground pins. IOREF. The voltage at which the i/o pins of the board are operating (i.e. VCC for the board). This is 5V on the Industrial 101.  Memory The ATmega32u4 has 32 KB (with 4 KB used for the bootloader). It also has 2.5 KB of SRAM and 1 KB of EEPROM (which can be read and written with the EEPROM library). The memory on the AR9331 is not embedded inside the processor. The RAM and the storage memory are externally connected. The Industrial 101 has 64 MB of DDR2 RAM and 16 MB of flash memory. The flash memory is preloaded in factory with a Linux distribution based on OpenWrt called Linino OS. You can change the content of the factory image, such as when you install a program or when you change a configuration file. You can return to the factory configuration by pressing the "USER1" button for 30 seconds.  The Linino OS installation occupies around 9 MB of the 16 MB available of the internal flash memory. You can use a micro SD card (adding an external slot) if you need more disk space for installing applications. Input and Output It is not possible to access the I/O pins of the Atheros AR9331. All I/O lines are tied to the 32U4.Each of the 7 digital i/o pins on the Industrial 101 can be used as an input or output, using pinMode(), digitalWrite(), and digitalRead() functions. They operate at 5 volts. Each pin can provide or receive a maximum of 40 mA and has an internal pull-up resistor (disconnected by default) of 20-50 kOhms.In addition, some pins have specialized functions: Serial:   Used to receive and transmit TTL serial data using the ATmega32U4 hardware serial capability via Serial1 class. The hardware serials of the ATmega32U4 and the AR9331 on the Industrial 101 are connected together and are used to communicate between the two processors. As is common in Linux systems, on the serial port of the AR9331 is exposed the console for access to the system, this means that you can access to the programs and tools offered by Linux from your sketch. TWI: Support TWI communication using the Wire library, it is reserved for Oled slot.  PWM: 5, 6. Provide 8-bit PWM output with the analogWrite() function. SPI: on the ICSP header. These pins support SPI communication using the SPI library. Note that the SPI pins are not connected to any of the digital I/O pins as they are on the Uno, They are only available on the ICSP connector.  The SPI pins are also connected to the AR9331 gpio pins, where it has been implemented in software the SPI interface. This means that the ATMega32u4 and the AR9331 can also communicate using the SPI protocol. LED: 13. There is a built-in LED connected to digital pin 13. When the pin is HIGH value, the LED is on, when the pin is LOW, it's off. There are several other status LEDs on the Industrial 101, indicating power (PWR), WLAN connection, WAN connection,TX and RX. Analog Inputs: A0 - A3 and A7 (on digital pins  6). The Industrial 101 has 4 analog inputs, labeled A0 through A3, all of which can also be used as digital i/o; and A7 is  on digital i/o pin 6. Each analog input provide 10 bits of resolution (i.e. 1024 different values). By default the analog inputs measure from ground to 5 volts, though is it possible to change the upper end of their range using the AREF pin and the analogReference() function. AREF. Reference voltage for the analog inputs. Used with analogReference(). There are 4 reset buttons with different functions on the board:  101 RST: reset the AR9331 microprocessor. Resetting the AR9331 will cause the reboot of the linux system. All the data stored in RAM will be lost and all the programs that are running will be terminated. 32U4 RST: reset the ATmega32U4 microcontroller. Typically used to add a reset button to shields which block the one on the board. USER1: connected to GP20 MIPS side and used to reset Wlan.This button has a double feature. Primarly serves to restore the WiFi to the factory configuration. The factory configuration consist to put the WiFi of the Industrial 101 in access point mode (AP) and assign to it the default IP address that is 192.168.240.1, in this condition you can connect with your computer to the a WiFi network that appear with the SSID name "Arduino-Ind-101-XXXXXXXXXXXX", where the twelve 'X' are the MAC address of your Industrial 101. Once connected you can reach the web panel of the Industrial 101 with a browser at the 192.168.240.1 or "http://arduino.local" address. Note that restoring the WiFi configuration will cause the reboot of the linux environment. To restore your WiFi configuration you have to press and hold the WLAN RST button for more 5 seconds but less 10 second. When you press the button the WLAN blue LED will start to blink and will keep still blinking when you release the button after 5 seconds indicating that the WiFi restore procedure has been recorded. The second function of the USER1 button is to restore the linux image to the default factory image. To restore the linux environment you must press the button for 30 seconds. Note that restoring the factory image make you lose all the files saved and softwares installed on the on-board flash memory connected to the AR9331. USER2: connected GP23 MIPS side and available to the user. Communication The Industrial 101 has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino, or other microcontrollers. The ATmega32U4 provides a dedicated UART TTL (5V) serial communication. The 32U4 also allows for serial (CDC) communication over USB and appears as a virtual com port to software on the computer. The chip also acts as a full speed USB 2.0 device, using standard USB COM drivers. The Arduino software includes a serial monitor which allows simple textual data to be sent to and from the Arduino board. The RX and TX LEDs on the board will flash when data is being transmitted via the USB connection to the computer. Digital pins 0 and 1 , not reported on final layout , are used for serial communication between the 32U4 and the AR9331. You can use to communication between the processors the Ciao library. Arduino Ciao is an easy-to-use and powerful technology that enables Arduino sketches to communicate intuitively with the "outside World". It aims to simplify interaction between microcontroller and Linino OS, allowing a variety of connections with most common protocols, third-party services and social networks. Ciao has been designed and developed to be modular and easily configurable. Its goal is to support several connectors capable of interacting with the system resources (filesystem, console, memory) and to communicate with the most common and useful protocols (XMPP, HTTP, WebSocket, COAP, etc..) and applications (Jabber, WeChat, Twitter, Facebook, etc.). Ciao Library is a lightweight library that can be used inside sketches for MCU to send and receive data, via serial communication, in a simple and intuitive way. A SoftwareSerial library allows for serial communication on any of the Industrial 101's digital pins.  The ATmega32U4 also supports I2C (TWI) and SPI communication. The Arduino software includes a Wire library to simplify use of the I2C bus. For SPI communication, use the SPI library. The Industrial 101 appears as a generic keyboard and mouse, and can be programmed to control these input devices using the Keyboard and Mouse classes. The onboard Ethernet (you need the "Ethernet add-on" for example dogrj45) and WiFi interfaces are exposed directly to the AR9331 processor. To send and receive data through them, use the Bridge or Ciao library.  The Industrial 101 is prepared to add an USB host (for example the dogUSB) that you allow to connect peripherals like USB flash devices for additional storage, keyboards, or webcams. You may need to download and install additional software for these devices to work.  Programming The Industrial 101 can be programmed with the Arduino software (download). Select "Arduino Industrial 101 from the Tools > Board menu (according to the microcontroller on your board). The ATmega32U4 on the Arduino Industrial 101 comes preburned with a bootloader that allows you to upload new code to it without the use of an external hardware programmer. It communicates using the AVR109 protocol.You can also bypass the bootloader and program the microcontroller through the ICSP (In-Circuit Serial Programming) header using Arduino ISP or similar; Automatic (Software) Reset Rather than requiring a physical press of the reset button before an upload, the Industrial 101 is designed in a way that allows it to be reset by software running on a connected computer. The reset is triggered when the Industrial 101's virtual (CDC) serial / COM port is opened at 1200 baud and then closed. When this happens, the processor will reset, breaking the USB connection to the computer (meaning that the virtual serial / COM port will disappear). After the processor resets, the bootloader starts, remaining active for about 8 seconds. The bootloader can also be initiated by pressing the reset button on the Industrial 101. Note that when the board first powers up, it will jump straight to the user sketch, if present, rather than initiating the bootloader. Because of the way the Industrial 101 handles reset it's best to let the Arduino software try to initiate the reset before uploading, especially if you are in the habit of pressing the reset button before uploading on other boards. If the software can't reset the board you can always start the bootloader by pressing the reset button on the board. Physical Characteristics The maximum length and width of the Industrial 101 PCB are 2.0 and 1.7 inches respectively, with the USB connector extending beyond the former dimension. Three screw holes allow the board to be attached to a surface or case. 

₹4,449.00*
ARDUINO LEONARDO WITH HEADERS-Original Made in Italy
Similar to an Arduino UNO, can be recognized by computer as a mouse or keyboard. The Arduino Leonardo is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega32u4 (datasheet). It has 20 digital input/output pins (of which 7 can be used as PWM outputs and 12 as analog inputs), a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a micro USB connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button. It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a USB cable or power it with a AC-to-DC adapter or battery to get started.  The Leonardo differs from all preceding boards in that the ATmega32u4 has built-in USB communication, eliminating the need for a secondary processor. This allows the Leonardo to appear to a connected computer as a mouse and keyboard, in addition to a virtual (CDC) serial / COM port. It also has other implications for the behavior of the board; these are detailed on the getting started page. Getting Started You can find in the  Getting Started section all the information you need to configure your board, use the Arduino Software (IDE), and start tinker with coding and electronics.  Specification Microcontroller ATmega32u4 Operating Voltage 5V Input Voltage (Recommended) 7-12V Input Voltage (limits) 6-20V Digital I/O Pins 20 PWM Channels 7 Analog Input Channels 12 DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA DC Current for 3.3V Pin 50 mA Flash Memory 32 KB (ATmega32u4) of which 4 KB used by bootloader SRAM 2.5 KB (ATmega32u4) EEPROM 1 KB (ATmega32u4) Clock Speed 16 MHz Lenght 68.6 mm Width 53.3 mm Weight 20 g Documentation OSH: Schematics The Arduino Leonardo is open-source hardware! You can build your own board using the following files: EAGLE FILES IN .ZIPSCHEMATICS IN .PDF Power  The Arduino Leonardo can be powered via the micro USB connection or with an external power supply. The power source is selected automatically. External (non-USB) power can come either from an AC-to-DC adapter (wall-wart) or battery. The adapter can be connected by plugging a 2.1mm center-positive plug into the board's power jack. Leads from a battery can be inserted in the Gnd and Vin pin headers of the POWER connector. The power pins are as follows:    VIN. The input voltage to the Arduino board when it's using an external power source (as opposed to 5 volts from the USB connection or other regulated power source). You can supply voltage through this pin, or, if supplying voltage via the power jack, access it through this pin. 5V. The regulated power supply used to power the microcontroller and other components on the board. This can come either from VIN via an on-board regulator, or be supplied by USB or another regulated 5V supply. 3V3. A 3.3 volt supply generated by the on-board regulator. Maximum current draw is 50 mA. GND. Ground pins. IOREF. The voltage at which the i/o pins of the board are operating (i.e. VCC for the board). This is 5V on the Leonardo.   Memory  The ATmega32u4 has 32 KB (with 4 KB used for the bootloader). It also has 2.5 KB of SRAM and 1 KB of EEPROM (which can be read and written with the EEPROM library).    Input and Output  Each of the 20 digital i/o pins on the Leonardo can be used as an input or output, usingpinMode(), digitalWrite(), and digitalRead() functions. They operate at 5 volts. Each pin can provide or receive a maximum of 40 mA and has an internal pull-up resistor (disconnected by default) of 20-50 kOhms. In addition, some pins have specialized functions:   Serial: 0 (RX) and 1 (TX). Used to receive (RX) and transmit (TX) TTL serial data using theATmega32U4 hardware serial capability. Note that on the Leonardo, the Serial class refers to USB (CDC) communication; for TTL serial on pins 0 and 1, use the Serial1 class. TWI: 2 (SDA) and 3 (SCL). Support TWI communication using the Wire library. External Interrupts: 3 (interrupt 0), 2 (interrupt 1), 0 (interrupt 2), 1 (interrupt 3) and 7 (interrupt 4). These pins can be configured to trigger an interrupt on a low value, a rising or falling edge, or a change in value. See the attachInterrupt() function for details. PWM: 3, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, and 13. Provide 8-bit PWM output with the analogWrite() function. SPI: on the ICSP header. These pins support SPI communication using the SPI library. Note that the SPI pins are not connected to any of the digital I/O pins as they are on the Uno, They are only available on the ICSP connector. This means that if you have a shield that uses SPI, but does NOT have a 6-pin ICSP connector that connects to the Leonardo's 6-pin ICSP header, the shield will not work. LED: 13. There is a built-in LED connected to digital pin 13. When the pin is HIGH value, the LED is on, when the pin is LOW, it's off. Analog Inputs: A0-A5, A6 - A11 (on digital pins 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 12). The Leonardo has 12 analog inputs, labeled A0 through A11, all of which can also be used as digital i/o. Pins A0-A5 appear in the same locations as on the Uno; inputs A6-A11 are on digital i/o pins 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 12 respectively. Each analog input provide 10 bits of resolution (i.e. 1024 different values). By default the analog inputs measure from ground to 5 volts, though is it possible to change the upper end of their range using the AREF pin and the analogReference() function.   There are a couple of other pins on the board:   AREF. Reference voltage for the analog inputs. Used with analogReference(). Reset. Bring this line LOW to reset the microcontroller. Typically used to add a reset button to shields which block the one on the board.   See also the mapping between Arduino pins and ATmega32u4 ports.    Communication The Leonardo has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino, or other microcontrollers. The ATmega32U4 provides UART TTL (5V) serial communication, which is available on digital pins 0 (RX) and 1 (TX). The 32U4 also allows for serial (CDC) communication over USB and appears as a virtual com port to software on the computer. The chip also acts as a full speed USB 2.0 device, using standard USB COM drivers. On Windows, a .inf file is required. The Arduino software includes a serial monitor which allows simple textual data to be sent to and from the Arduino board. The RX and TX LEDs on the board will flash when data is being transmitted via the USB connection to the computer (but not for serial communication on pins 0 and 1). A SoftwareSerial library allows for serial communication on any of the Leonardo's digital pins. The ATmega32U4 also supports I2C (TWI) and SPI communication. The Arduino software includes a Wire library to simplify use of the I2C bus; see the documentation for details. For SPI communication, use the SPI library. The Leonardo appears as a generic keyboard and mouse, and can be programmed to control these input devices using the Keyboard and Mouse classes.    Programming The Leonardo can be programmed with the Arduino software (download). Select "Arduino Leonardo from the Tools > Board menu (according to the microcontroller on your board). For details, see the reference and tutorials. The ATmega32U4 on the Arduino Leonardo comes preburned with a bootloader that allows you to upload new code to it without the use of an external hardware programmer. It communicates using the AVR109 protocol. You can also bypass the bootloader and program the microcontroller through the ICSP (In-Circuit Serial Programming) header using Arduino ISP or similar; see these instructions for details.    Automatic (Software) Reset and Bootloader Initiation Rather than requiring a physical press of the reset button before an upload, the Leonardo is designed in a way that allows it to be reset by software running on a connected computer. The reset is triggered when the Leonardo's virtual (CDC) serial / COM port is opened at 1200 baud and then closed. When this happens, the processor will reset, breaking the USB connection to the computer (meaning that the virtual serial / COM port will disappear). After the processor resets, the bootloader starts, remaining active for about 8 seconds. The bootloader can also be initiated by pressing the reset button on the Leonardo. Note that when the board first powers up, it will jump straight to the user sketch, if present, rather than initiating the bootloader. Because of the way the Leonardo handles reset it's best to let the Arduino software try to initiate the reset before uploading, especially if you are in the habit of pressing the reset button before uploading on other boards. If the software can't reset the board you can always start the bootloader by pressing the reset button on the board.    USB Overcurrent Protection The Leonardo has a resettable polyfuse that protects your computer's USB ports from shorts and overcurrent. Although most computers provide their own internal protection, the fuse provides an extra layer of protection. If more than 500 mA is applied to the USB port, the fuse will automatically break the connection until the short or overload is removed.    Physical Characteristics The maximum length and width of the Leonardo PCB are 2.7 and 2.1 inches respectively, with the USB connector and power jack extending beyond the former dimension. Four screw holes allow the board to be attached to a surface or case. Note that the distance between digital pins 7 and 8 is 160 mil (0.16"), not an even multiple of the 100 mil spacing of the other pins.  

₹1,549.00*
ARDUINO MEGA 2560 REV3
ARDUINO MEGA 2560 REV3
The MEGA 2560 is designed for more complex projects. With 54 digital I/O pins, 16 analog inputs and a larger space for your sketch it is the recommended board for 3D printers and robotics projects. This gives your projects plenty of room and opportunities. The Arduino Mega 2560 is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega2560. It has 54 digital input/output pins (of which 15 can be used as PWM outputs), 16 analog inputs, 4 UARTs (hardware serial ports), a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a USB connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button. It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a USB cable or power it with a AC-to-DC adapter or battery to get started. The Mega 2560 board is compatible with most shields designed for the Uno and the former boards Duemilanove or Diecimila.   The Mega 2560 is an update to the Arduino Mega, which it replaces. You can find here your board warranty informations.   Getting Started You can find in the Getting Started section all the information you need to configure your board, use the Arduino Software (IDE), and start tinker with coding and electronics. Specifications Microcontroller ATmega2560 Operating Voltage 5V Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12V Input Voltage (limit) 6-20V Digital I/O Pins 54 (of which 15 provide PWM output) Analog Input Pins 16 DC Current per I/O Pin 20 mA DC Current for 3.3V Pin 50 mA Flash Memory 256 KB of which 8 KB used by bootloader SRAM 8 KB EEPROM 4 KB Clock Speed 16 MHz LED_BUILTIN 13 Length 101.52 mm Width 53.3 mm Weight 37 g

₹3,549.00*
ARDUINO MICRO WITHOUT HEADERS
ARDUINO MICRO WITHOUT HEADERS
Arduino Micro is the smallest board of the family, easy to integrate it in everyday objects to make them interactive.The Micro is based on the ATmega32U4 microcontroller featuring a built-in USB which makes the Micro recognisable as a mouse or keyboard.   The Micro is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega32U4 (datasheet), developed in conjunction with Adafruit. It has 20 digital input/output pins (of which 7 can be used as PWM outputs and 12 as analog inputs), a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a micro USB connection, an ICSP header, and a reset button. It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a micro USB cable to get started. It has a form factor that enables it to be easily placed on a breadboard.   The Micro board is similar to the Arduino Leonardo in that the ATmega32U4 has built-in USB communication, eliminating the need for a secondary processor. This allows the Micro to appear to a connected computer as a mouse and keyboard, in addition to a virtual (CDC) serial / COM port. It also has other implications for the behavior of the board; these are detailed on the getting started page. You can find here your board warranty informations.   Getting Started You can find in the Getting Started section all the information you need to configure your board, use the Arduino Software (IDE), and start tinker with coding and electronics. Specification Microcontroller ATmega32U4 Operating Voltage 5V Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12V Input Voltage (limit) 6-20V Digital I/O Pins 20 PWM Channels 7 Analog Input Channels 12 DC Current per I/O Pin 20 mA DC Current for 3.3V Pin 50 mA Flash Memory 32 KB (ATmega32U4) of which 4 KB used by bootloader SRAM 2.5 KB (ATmega32U4) EEPROM 1 KB (ATmega32U4) Clock Speed 16 MHz LED_BUILTIN 13 Length 48 mm Width 18 mm Weight 13 g   Documentation   OSH: Schematics, Reference Design, Board size Arduino / Genuino Micro is open-source hardware! You can build your own board using the follwing files:   EAGLE FILES IN .ZIPSCHEMATICS IN .PDFBOARD SIZE IN .DXF   Programming The Micro board can be programmed with the Arduino Software (IDE). Select "Arduino/Genuino Micro from the Tools > Board menu. For details, see the reference and tutorials.  The ATmega32U4 on the Micro comes preprogrammed with a bootloader that allows you to upload new code to it without the use of an external hardware programmer. It communicates using the AVR109 protocol. You can also bypass the bootloader and program the microcontroller through the ICSP (In-Circuit Serial Programming) header using Arduino ISP or similar; see these instructions for details.   Warnings The Micro has a resettable polyfuse that protects your computer's USB ports from shorts and overcurrent. Although most computers provide their own internal protection, the fuse provides an extra layer of protection. If more than 500 mA is applied to the USB port, the fuse will automatically break the connection until the short or overload is removed.   Power The Micro can be powered via the micro USB connection or with an external power supply. The power source is selected automatically. External (non-USB) power can come either from a DC power supply or battery. Leads from a battery or DC power supply can be connected to the Gnd and Vin pins.  The board can operate on an external supply of 6 to 20 volts. If supplied with less than 7V, however, the 5V pin may supply less than five volts and the board may become unstable. If using more than 12V, the voltage regulator may overheat and damage the board. The recommended range is 7 to 12 volts.   The power pins are as follows:  VI. The input voltage to the MICRO board when it's using an external power source (as opposed to 5 volts from the USB connection or other regulated power source). You can supply voltage through this pin. 5V. The regulated power supply used to power the microcontroller and other components on the board. This can come either from VIN via an on-board regulator, or be supplied by USB or another regulated 5V supply. 3V. A 3.3 volt supply generated by the on-board regulator. Maximum current draw is 50 mA. GND. Ground pins.   Memory  The ATmega32U4 has 32 KB (with 4 KB used for the bootloader). It also has 2.5 KB of SRAM and 1 KB of EEPROM (which can be read and written with the EEPROM library).   Input and Output See the mapping between Arduino pins and ATmega 32U4 ports, and the Pin Mapping of the Arduino Micro: PIN MAPPING ATmega 32U4 PINOUT ATmega 32U4 Each of the 20 digital i/o pins on the Micro can be used as an input or output, using pinMode(),digitalWrite(), and digitalRead() functions. They operate at 5 volts. Each pin can provide or receive 20 mA as recommended operating condition and has an internal pull-up resistor (disconnected by default) of 20-50 k ohm. A maximum of 40mA is the value that must not be exceeded to avoid permanent damage to the microcontroller.   In addition, some pins have specialized functions:  Serial: 0 (RX) and 1 (TX). Used to receive (RX) and transmit (TX) TTL serial data using the ATmega32U4 hardware serial capability. Note that on the Micro, the Serial class refers to USB (CDC) communication; for TTL serial on pins 0 and 1, use the Serial1 class. TWI: 2 (SDA) and 3 (SCL). Support TWI communication using the Wire library. External Interrupts: 0(RX), 1(TX), 2, 3 and 7. These pins can be configured to trigger an interrupt on a low value, a rising or falling edge, or a change in value. See the attachInterrupt() function for details. PWM: 3, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11 and 13. Provide 8-bit PWM output with the analogWrite() function. SPI: on the ICSP header. These pins support SPI communication using the SPI library. Note that the SPI pins are not connected to any of the digital I/O pins as they are on the Uno, they are only available on the ICSP connector and on the nearby pins labelled MISO, MOSI and SCK. RX_LED/SS This is an additional pin compared to the Leonardo. It is connected to the RX_LED that indicates the activity of transmission during USB communication, but is can also used as slave select pin (SS) in SPI communication. LED: 13. There is a built-in LED connected to digital pin 13. When the pin is HIGH value, the LED is on, when the pin is LOW, it's off. Analog Inputs: A0-A5, A6 - A11 (on digital pins 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 12). The Micro has a total of 12 analog inputs, pins from A0 to A5 are labelled directly on the pins and the other ones that you can access in code using the constants from A6 trough A11 are shared respectively on digital pins 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 12. All of which can also be used as digital I/O. Each analog input provide 10 bits of resolution (i.e. 1024 different values). By default the analog inputs measure from ground to 5 volts, though is it possible to change the upper end of their range using the AREF pin and the analogReference() function.   There are a couple of other pins on the board:  AREF. Reference voltage for the analog inputs. Used with analogReference(). Reset. Bring this line LOW to reset the microcontroller. Typically used to add a reset button to shields which block the one on the board.   Communication The Micro has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another board of the Arduino & Genuino family, or other microcontrollers. The 32U4 provides UART TTL (5V) serial communication, which is available on digital pins 0 (RX) and 1 (TX). The ATmega32U4 also allows for serial (CDC) communication over USB and appears as a virtual com port to software on the computer. The chip also acts as a full speed USB 2.0 device, using standard USB COM drivers. On Windows, a .inf file is required . The Arduino Software (IDE) includes a serial monitor which allows simple textual data to be sent to and from the board. The RX and TX LEDs on the board will flash when data is being transmitted via the USB connection to the computer (but not for serial communication on pins 0 and 1). A SoftwareSerial library allows for serial communication on other Micro's digital pins. The ATmega32U4 also supports I2C (TWI) and SPI communication. The Arduino Software (IDE) includes a Wire library to simplify use of the I2C bus; see the documentation for details. For SPI communication, use the SPI library.  The Micro appears as a generic keyboard and mouse, and can be programmed to control these input devices using the Keyboard and Mouse classes. Physical Characteristics The maximum length and width of the Micro PCB are 4.8cm and 1.77cm respectively, with the USB connector extending beyond the former dimension. The layout allows for easy placement on a solderless breadboard..   Automatic (Software) Reset and Bootloader Initiation Rather than requiring a physical press of the reset button before an upload, the Micro board is designed in a way that allows it to be reset by software running on a connected computer. The reset is triggered when the Micro's virtual (CDC) serial / COM port is opened at 1200 baud and then closed. When this happens, the processor will reset, breaking the USB connection to the computer (meaning that the virtual serial / COM port will disappear). After the processor resets, the bootloader starts, remaining active for about 8 seconds. The bootloader can also be initiated by pressing the reset button on the Micro. Note that when the board first powers up, it will jump straight to the user sketch, if present, rather than initiating the bootloader.  Because of the way the Micro handles reset it's best to let the Arduino Software (IDE) try to initiate the reset before uploading, especially if you are in the habit of pressing the reset button before uploading on other boards. If the software can't reset the board, you can always start the bootloader by pressing the reset button on the board.  

₹1,939.00*
Arduino MKR Fox 1200
Arduino MKR Fox 1200
  Arduino MKR FOX 1200 has been designed to offer a practical and cost effective solution for makers seeking to add SigFox connectivity to their projects with minimal previous experience in networking. It is based on the Atmel SAMD21 and a ATA8520 SigFox module. The design includes the ability to power the board using two 1.5V AA or AAA batteries or external 5V. Switching from one source to the other is done automatically. A good 32 bit computational power similar to the Zero board, the usual rich set of I/O interfaces, low power SigFox communication and the ease of use of the Arduino Software (IDE) for code development and programming. All these features make this board the preferred choice for the emerging IoT battery-powered projects in a compact form factor. The USB port can be used to supply power (5V) to the board. The Arduino MKR FOX 1200 is able to run with or without the batteries connected and has limited power consumption. Warning: Unlike most Arduino & Genuino boards, the MKRFOX1200 runs at 3.3V. The maximum voltage that the I/O pins can tolerate is 3.3V. Applying voltages higher than 3.3V to any I/O pin could damage the board. While output to 5V digital devices is possible, bidirectional communication with 5V devices needs proper level shifting. Data planning The MKRFOX1200 price includes a subscription to the SigFox network for one year. The plan will be automatically activated after the fourth message has been sent. You can send up to 140 messages per day. Antenna The MKR FOX 1200 is not shipped with a GSM antenna that can be attached to the board with the micro UFL connector. If you want to change the antenna please check that it can accept frequencies in the SigFox's range (868 Mhz). GSM Antenna Please note: for best result, do not attach the antenna to a metallic surface like car chassis, etc. Batteries, Pins and board LEDs Battery capacity: The connected batteries must have a nominal voltage of 1.5V  Battery connector: If you want to connect a battery pack (2x AA or AAA) to your MKR FOX 1200 use the screw terminal block. Polarity : as reported on the silk in the bottom of the board, positive pin is the closest to the USB connector Vin: This pin can be used to power the board with a regulated 5V source. If the power is fed through this pin, the USB power source is disconnected. This is the only way you can supply 5v (range is 5V to maximum 6V) to the board not using USB. This pin is an INPUT. 5V: This pin outputs 5V from the the board when powered from the USB connector or from the VIN pin of the board. It is unregulated and the voltage is taken directly from the inputs.  VCC: This pin outputs 3.3V through the on-board voltage regulator. This voltage is 3.3V if USB or VIN is used and equal to the series of the two batteries when they are used LED ON: This LED is connected to the 5V input from either USB or VIN. It is not connected to the battery power. This means that it lits up when power is from USB or VIN, but stays off when the board is running on battery power. This maximizes the usage of the energy stored in the battery. It is therefore normal to have the board properly running on battery power without the LED ON being lit. On board LED: On MKRFOX1200 the onboard LED is connected to D6 and not D13 as on the other boards. Blink example or other sketcthes that uses pin 13 for on board LED may need to be changed to work properly.  

₹4,599.00*
Arduino MKR GSM 1400
  Please note: This board does not ship with a SIM card. Arduino MKR GSM 1400 has been designed to offer a practical and cost effective solution for makers seeking to add global GSM connectivity to their projects with minimal previous experience in networking. It is based on the Atmel SAMD21 and a SARAU201 GSM module. The design includes the ability to power the board using a LiPo battery or external power source rated 5V. Switching from one source to the other is done automatically. A good 32 bit computational power similar to the Zero board, the usual rich set of I/O interfaces, gobal GSM communication and the ease of use of the Arduino Software (IDE) for code development and programming. All these features make this board the preferred choice for the emerging IoT battery-powered projects in a compact form factor. The USB port can be used to supply power (5V) to the board. During cellular transmissions the peak current required by the board will exceed 500mA. This is in excess of what can sourced by a standard USB port, so it is MANDATORY to have a 1500 mAh or higher LiPo battery plugged all the time, the current provided by the USB port will be supplmented by the battery.  When powering the board using Vin, a 5V power supply that can supply atleast 2A is required.. Warning: Unlike most Arduino & Genuino boards, the MKR GSM 1400 runs at 3.3V. The maximum voltage that the I/O pins can tolerate is 3.3V. Applying voltages higher than 3.3V to any I/O pin could damage the board. While output to 5V digital devices is possible, bidirectional communication with 5V devices needs proper level shifting. Technical Specification Microcontroller SAMD21 Cortex-M0+ 32bit low power ARM MCU Board Power Supply (USB/VIN) 5V Supported Battery(*) 3.7V LiPo Circuit Operating Voltage 3.3V Digital I/O Pins 8 PWM Pins 12 (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, A3 - or 18 -, A4 -or 19) UART 1 SPI 1 I2C 1 Analog Input Pins 7 (ADC 8/10/12 bit) Analog Output Pins 1 (DAC 10 bit) External Interrupts 8 (0, 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, A1 -or 16-, A2 - or 17) DC Current per I/O Pin 7 mA Flash Memory 256 KB SRAM 32 KB EEPROM no Clock Speed 32.768 kHz (RTC), 48 MHz LED_BUILTIN 6 Full-Speed USB Device and embedded Host   Antenna power 2dB Carrier frequency 433/868/915 MHz Working region Global Length 67.64 mm Width 25 mm     Antenna The MKR GSM 1400 has to be used with a GSM antenna that can be attached to the board with the micro UFL connector. Please check that it can accept frequencies in the GSM's range (880/915 MHz).  Please note: for best result, do not attach the antenna to a metallic surface like car chassis, etc. Batteries, Pins and board LEDs Battery capacity: The connected battery must be a 3.7V LiPo Vin: This pin can be used to power the board with a regulated voltage source rated at 5V. If the power is fed through this pin, the USB power source is disconnected. This is the only way you can supply MAXIMUM 5V to the board not using USB. This pin is an INPUT. 5V: This pin outputs 5V from the the board when powered from the USB connector or from the VIN pin of the board. It is unregulated and the voltage is taken directly from the inputs.  VCC: This pin outputs 3.3V through the on-board voltage regulator. This voltage is 3.3V if USB or VIN is used and equal to the series of the two batteries when they are used LED ON: This LED is connected to the input voltage source from either USB or VIN. It is also connected to the battery power. This means that it is ON (with a lower intensity) also when the battery is inserted. Onboard LED: On MKR GSM 1400 the on board LED is connected to D6 and not D13 as on the other boards. Blink example or other sketcthes that uses pin 13 for on board LED may need to be changed to work properly.  

₹7,589.00*
Arduino MKR IoT Bundle
Arduino MKR IoT Bundle
  The MKR IoT Bundle is a great way to get started with the Internet of Things! The MKR IoT Bundle includes the components you need to make 5 IoT projects following the step-by-step online tutorials on the Arduino Project Hub online platform The MKR IoT Bundle walks you through the basics of using the Arduino MKR1000 for IoT applications. You'll learn through building 5 creative experiments thanks to the step by step online tutorials available on the Arduino Project Hub platform. The MKR IoT bundle includes a selection of the most common and useful electronic components to build 5 IoT experiments. The 5 experiments you can make: I Love You Pillow Puzzle Box Pavlov's Cat The Nerd Plant Communicator The kit is based around the MKR1000—a powerful board that combines the functionality of the Zero and the Wi-Fi Shield—and enables Makers to add connectivity to their designs with minimal prior networking experience. Each bundle includes: 1 Arduino MKR1000 board, with header soldered. 1 micro USB cable,  1 400-point breadboard,  70 solid-core jumper wires,  1 9V battery snap,  1 stranded jumper wire  1 stranded jumper wire, 6 phototransistors,  3 potentiometers (10 kilohm),  10 pushbuttons,  1 temperature sensor (TMP36),  1 tilt sensor,  1 alphanumeric LCD (16 x 2 characters),  1 bright white,  34 LEDs (1 bright white, 1 RGB, 8 red, 8 green, 8 yellow, 3 blue),  1 small DC motor (6/9V),  1 small servo motor,  1 piezo capsule (PKM17EPP-4001-B0),  1 H-bridge motor driver (L293D),  1 octocouplers (4NE5),  2 MOSFET transistors (IRF520),  5 capacitors (100uF), 5 diodes (1N4007),  3 transparent gels (R,G,B) 1 male pin strip (40 x 1),  20 resistors (220 ohm),  5 resistors (560 ohm),  5 resistors (1 kilohm),  5 resistors (4.7 kilohm),  20 resistors (10 kilohm),  5 resistors (1 megohm),  5 resistors (10 megohm) Please note: don't connect 9V to the board, as it will be damaged.You can use the 9v Battery strip to supply an external component.  

₹7,589.00*
Arduino MKR VIDOR 4000
Arduino MKR VIDOR 4000
The Arduino MKR Vidor 4000 brings Arduino's ease of use to the work with the most powerful reprogrammable chips that exist: FPGAs. With Vidor you can create a board where all pins are PWM signals controlling the speed of motors. You can capture sound in real time and make a sound effect pedal for your guitar. It is possible to create a real-time computer reading sensor information and sending it to a state-of-the-art monitor or capture video and overlay sensor information on the image that will then later be sent over to a screen. You can connect to the Arduino IoT Cloud and control a complex laboratory machine running a large amount of motors. You could even prototype your own processors inside the FPGA and have it to work in parallel to the other microcontroller on the board. Vidor is a device that invites for experimentation, precision, and high speed computation. See what Massimo Banzi, Arduino Co-founder, has to say about this board in the following video. The main chip on the board is the Intel® Cyclone® 10CL016; it contains 16K logic elements, 504 KB of embedded RAM, and 56 18x18 bit HW multipliers for high-speed DSP operations. Each pin can toggle at over 150 MHz and can be configured for functions such as UARTs, (Q)SPI, high resolution/high frequency PWM, quadrature encoder, I2C, I2S, Sigma Delta DAC, etc.  The board comes with 8 MB of SRAM to support the FPGA operations on video and audio. The FPGA code is stored in a 2 MB QSPI Flash chip, of which 1 MB is allocated for user applications. It is possible to perform high-speed DSP operations for audio and video processing. Therefore, the Vidor includes a Micro HDMI connector for audio and video output, and a MIPI camera connector for video input. All of the board's pins are driven both by SAMD21 and FPGA, while respecting the MKR family format. Finally, there is a Mini PCI Express connector with up to 25 user programmable pins, that can be used for connecting your FPGA as a peripheral to a computer or to creat your own PCI interfaces.  The board's microcontroller is a low power Arm® Cortex®-M0 32-bit SAMD21, like in the other boards within the Arduino MKR family. The WiFi and Bluetooth® connectivity is performed with a module from u-blox, the NINA-W10, a low power chipset operating in the 2.4GHz range. On top of those, secure communication is ensured through the Microchip® ECC508 crypto chip. Besides that, you can find a battery charger, and a directionable RGB LED on-board.  See all of the board's connectors in the following image: The Power of the FPGA  If you are not familiar with the term, an FPGA is a Field Programmable Gate Array, a chip where the logic commanding its operations is not written at the time of manufacturing. It is possible to write your own CPU, a series of dedicated high frequency PWM outputs, a digital sound mixer, video overlay machine, or anything you can imagine. The main limitation is the amount of logical gates needed to design any of those applications.  As a way to exemplify how such a powerful processor can be integrated in your typical Arduino workflow, we have created a series of libraries that can perform some simple tasks incorporaring the microcontroller and the specialized FPGA code. See the following examples to see how it works: Draw the Arduino logo: see how to use the VidorGraphics library to output video signal to a monitor via the HDMI connector.  Enable camera: get a video signal from a camera and send it to your computer monitor.   If you are an FPGA-savy developer you will be glad to know that we have released a series of libraries providing many of the basic functionalities needed for your projects.   WiFi and Arduino IoT Cloud  At Arduino we have made connecting to a WiFi network as easy as getting an LED to blink. You can get your board to connect to any kind of existing WiFi network, or use it to create your own Arduino Access Point.  Bluetooth® and BLE  The communications chipset on the MKR Vidor 4000 can be both a BLE and Bluetooth® client and host device. Something pretty unique in the world of microcontroller platforms. If you want to see how easy it is to create a Bluetooth® central or a peripheral device.

₹7,959.00*
Arduino MKR WAN 1300 (LORA Connectivity)
  Arduino MKR WAN 1300 has been designed to offer a practical and cost effective solution for makers seeking to add Lo-Ra connectivity to their projects with minimal previous experience in networking. It is based on the Atmel SAMD21 and a Murata  CMWX1ZZABZ Lo-Ra module. The design includes the ability to power the board using two 1.5V AA or AAA batteries or external 5V. Switching from one source to the other is done automatically. A good 32 bit computational power similar to the MKR ZERO board, the usual rich set of I/O interfaces, low power Lo-Ra communication and the ease of use of the Arduino Software (IDE) for code development and programming. All these features make this board the preferred choice for the emerging IoT battery-powered projects in a compact form factor. The USB port can be used to supply power (5V) to the board. The Arduino MKR WAN 1300 is able to run with or without the batteries connected and has limited power consumption. Warning: Unlike most Arduino & Genuino boards, the MKR WAN 1300 runs at 3.3V. The maximum voltage that the I/O pins can tolerate is 3.3V. Applying voltages higher than 3.3V to any I/O pin could damage the board. While output to 5V digital devices is possible, bidirectional communication with 5V devices needs proper level shifting. Technical Specification Microcontroller SAMD21 Cortex-M0+ 32bit low power ARM MCU Board Power Supply (USB/VIN) 5V Supported Batteries(*) 2x AA or AAA Circuit Operating Voltage 3.3V Digital I/O Pins 8 PWM Pins 12 (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, A3 - or 18 -, A4 -or 19) UART 1 SPI 1 I2C 1 Analog Input Pins 7 (ADC 8/10/12 bit) Analog Output Pins 1 (DAC 10 bit) External Interrupts 8 (0, 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, A1 -or 16-, A2 - or 17) DC Current per I/O Pin 7 mA Flash Memory 256 KB SRAM 32 KB EEPROM no Clock Speed 32.768 kHz (RTC), 48 MHz LED_BUILTIN 6 Full-Speed USB Device and embedded Host   Antenna power 2dB Carrier frequency 433/868/915 MHz Working region EU/US Length 67.64 mm Width 25 mm Antenna The MKR WAN 1300 has to be used with GSM antenna that can be attached to the board with the micro UFL connector. Please check that it can accept frequencies in the LoRa's range (433/868/915 MHz).  Please note: for best result, do not attach the antenna to a metallic surface like car chassis, etc. Batteries, Pins and board LEDs Battery capacity: The connected batteries must have a nominal voltage of 1.5V  Battery connector: If you want to connect a battery pack (2x AA or AAA) to your MKR WAN 1300 use the screw terminal block. Polarity : as reported on the silk in the bottom of the board, positive pin is the closest to the USB connector Vin: This pin can be used to power the board with a regulated 5V source. If the power is fed through this pin, the USB power source is disconnected. This is the only way you can supply 5v (range is 5V to maximum 6V) to the board not using USB. This pin is an INPUT. 5V: This pin outputs 5V from the the board when powered from the USB connector or from the VIN pin of the board. It is unregulated and the voltage is taken directly from the inputs.  VCC: This pin outputs 3.3V through the on-board voltage regulator. This voltage is 3.3V if USB or VIN is used and equal to the series of the two batteries when they are used LED ON: This LED is connected to the 5V input from either USB or VIN. It is not connected to the battery power. This means that it lits up when power is from USB or VIN, but stays off when the board is running on battery power. This maximizes the usage of the energy stored in the battery. It is therefore normal to have the board properly running on battery power without the LED ON being lit. Onboard LED: On MKR WAN 1300 the onboard LED is connected to D6 and not D13 as on the other boards. Blink example or other sketcthes that uses pin 13 for on board LED may need to be changed to work properly.

₹4,289.00*
Arduino MKR Wan 1310
The Arduino MKR WAN 1310 board provides a practical and cost effective solution to add LoRa® connectivity to projects  requiring low power. This open source board can be connected to: the Arduino IoT Cloud, your own LoRa® network using the Arduino LoRa® PRO Gateway, existing LoRaWAN™ infrastructure like The Things Network, or even other boards using the direct connectivity mode. Better and More Efficient  The MKR WAN 1310, brings in a series of improvements when compared to its predecessor, the MKR WAN 1300. While still based on the Microchip® SAMD21 low power processor, the Murata CMWX1ZZABZ LoRa® module, and the MKR family’s characteristic crypto chip (the ECC508), the MKR WAN 1310 includes a new battery charger, a 2MByte SPI Flash, and improved control of the board’s power consumption.  Improved Battery Power The latest modifications have considerably improved the battery life on the MKR WAN 1310. When properly configured, the power consumption is now as low as 104uA! It is also possible to use the USB port to supply power (5V) to the board; run the board with or without batteries - the choice is yours.  On-board Storage  Data logging and other OTA (Over The Air) functions are now possible since the inclusion of the on board 2MByte Flash. This new exciting feature will let you transfer configuration files from the infrastructure onto the board, create your own scripting commands, or simply store data locally to send it whenever the connectivity is best. Whilst the MKR WAN 1310’s crypto chip adds further security by storing credentials & certificates in the embedded secure element. These features make it the perfect IoT node and building block for low-power wide-area IoT devices. The Arduino MKR WAN 1310 is based on the SAMD21 microcontroller. Microcontroller SAMD21 Cortex®-M0+ 32bit low power ARM MCU (datasheet) Radio module CMWX1ZZABZ (datasheet) Board Power Supply (USB/VIN) 5V Secure Element ATECC508 (datasheet) Supported Batteries rechargeable Li-Ion, or Li-Po, 1024 mAh minimum capacity Circuit Operating Voltage 3.3V Digital I/O Pins 8 PWM Pins 13 (0 .. 8, 10, 12, 18 / A3, 19 / A4) UART 1 SPI 1 I2C 1 Analog Input Pins 7 (ADC 8/10/12 bit) Analog Output Pins 1 (DAC 10 bit) External Interrupts 8 (0, 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 16 / A1, 17 / A2) DC Current per I/O Pin 7 mA CPU Flash Memory 256 KB (internal) QSPI Flash Memory 2MByte (external) SRAM 32 KB EEPROM no Clock Speed 32.768 kHz (RTC), 48 MHz LED_BUILTIN 6 USB Full-Speed USB Device and embedded Host Antenna gain 2dB (bundled pentaband antenna) Carrier frequency 433/868/915 MHz Working region EU/US (confirmed) other countries check your region's spectrum availability Length 67.64 mm Width 25 mm Weight 32 gr. Pinout Diagram  Download the full pinout diagram as PDF here.

₹4,179.00*
Arduino MKR WIFI 1010
Arduino MKR WIFI 1010
The Arduino MKR WiFi 1010 is the easiest point of entry to basic IoT and pico-network application design. Whether you are looking at building a sensor network connected to your office or home router, or if you want to create a BLE device sending data to a cellphone, the MKR WiFi 1010 is your one-stop-solution for many of the basic IoT application scenarios. See what Massimo Banzi, Arduino Co-founder, has to say about this board in the following video.  The board's main processor is a low power Arm® Cortex®-M0 32-bit SAMD21, like in the other boards within the Arduino MKR family. The WiFi and Bluetooth® connectivity is performed with a module from u-blox, the NINA-W10, a low power chipset operating in the 2.4GHz range. On top of those, secure communication is ensured through the Microchip® ECC508 crypto chip. Besides that, you can find a battery charger, and a directionable RGB LED on-board.  WiFi and Arduino IoT Cloud At Arduino we have made connecting to a WiFi network as easy as getting an LED to blink. You can get your board to connect to any kind of existing WiFi network, or use it to create your own Arduino Access Point. The specific set of examples we provide for the MKR WiFi 1010 can be consulted at the WiFiNINA library reference page.  It is also possible to connect your board to different Cloud services, Arduino's own among others. Here some examples on how to get the MKR WiFi 1010 to connect to: Arduino's own IoT Cloud: Arduino's IoT Cloud is a simple and fast way to ensure secure communication for all of your connected Things. Blynk: a simple project from our community connecting to Blynk to operate your board from a phone with little code IFTTT: see an in-depth case of building a smart plug connected to IFTTT AWS IoT Core: we made this example on how to connect to Amazon Web Services Azure: visit this github repository explaining how to connect a temperature sensor to Azure's Cloud Firebase: you want to connect to Google's Firebase, this Arduino library will show you how  Bluetooth® and BLE  The communications chipset on the MKR WiFi 1010 can be both a BLE and Bluetooth® client and host device. Something pretty unique in the world of microcontroller platforms. The Arduino MKR WiFi 1010 is based on the SAMD21 microcontroller. Microcontroller SAMD21 Cortex®-M0+ 32bit low power ARM MCU (datasheet) Radio module u-blox NINA-W102 (datasheet) Board Power Supply (USB/VIN) 5V Secure Element ATECC508 (datasheet) Supported Battery Li-Po Single Cell, 3.7V, 1024mAh Minimum Circuit Operating Voltage 3.3V Digital I/O Pins 8 PWM Pins 13 (0 .. 8, 10, 12, 18 / A3, 19 / A4) UART 1 SPI 1 I2C 1 Analog Input Pins 7 (ADC 8/10/12 bit) Analog Output Pins 1 (DAC 10 bit) External Interrupts 8 (0, 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 16 / A1, 17 / A2) DC Current per I/O Pin 7 mA CPU Flash Memory 256 KB (internal) SRAM 32 KB EEPROM no Clock Speed 32.768 kHz (RTC), 48 MHz LED_BUILTIN 6 USB Full-Speed USB Device and embedded Host Length 61.5 mm Width 25 mm Weight 32 gr. Pinout Diagram   Download the full pinout diagram as PDF here. Additional I2C Port  The MKR WiFi 1010 has an additional connector meant as an extension of the I2C bus. It's a small form factor 5-pin connector with 1.0 mm pitch. The mechanical details of the connector can be found in the connector's datasheet.  The I2C port, also referred to as the Eslov self-identification port within Arduino, comes with: SDA, SCL, GND, +5V, and an extra digital pin meant to send an alarm to the otherwise plain I2C devices connected to it. The pinout is shown in the following image: If you are interested in designing your own modules for Arduino boards with this expansion port, the connector we suggest using is code: SHR-05V-S-B, also in the picture.

₹3,529.00*
ARDUINO MKR ZERO
ARDUINO MKR ZERO
MKR ZERO has an on-board SD connector with dedicated SPI interfaces (SPI1) that allows you to play with MUSIC files with no extra hardware! Watch out music makers, we’ve got some news for you! We have released two libraries for your enjoyment: Arduino Sound library – a simple way to play and analyze audio data using Arduino on SAM D21-based boards.   I2S library – to use the I2S protocol on SAMD21-based boards. For those who don’t know, I2S (Inter-IC Sound) is an electrical serial bus interface standard for connecting digital audio devices.   The MKR ZERO brings you the power of a Zero in the smaller format established by the MKR form factor. The MKR ZERO board acts as a great educational tool for learning about 32-bit application development. It has an on-board SD connector with dedicated SPI interfaces (SPI1) that allows you to play with MUSIC files with no extra hardware!  The board is powered by Atmel’s SAMD21 MCU, which features a 32-bit ARM Cortex® M0+ core. Warning: Unlike most Arduino & Genuino boards, the MKRZero runs at 3.3V. The maximum voltage that the I/O pins can tolerate is 3.3V. Applying voltages higher than 3.3V to any I/O pin could damage the board. The board contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a micro-USB cable or power it by a LiPo battery. The battery voltage can also be monitored since a connection between the battery and the analog converter of the board exists.  You can find here your board warranty informations.  Getting Started In the Getting Started section, you can find all the information you need to configure your board, use the Arduino Software (IDE), and start to tinker with coding and electronics.  Specification Microcontroller SAMD21 Cortex-M0+ 32bit low power ARM MCU Board Power Supply (USB/VIN) 5V Supported Battery(*) Li-Po single cell, 3.7V, 700mAh minimum DC Current for 3.3V Pin 600mA DC Current for 5V Pin 600mA Circuit Operating Voltage 3.3V Digital I/O Pins 22 PWM Pins 12 (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, A3 - or 18 -, A4 -or 19) UART 1 SPI 1 I2C 1 Analog Input Pins 7 (ADC 8/10/12 bit) Analog Output Pins 1 (DAC 10 bit) External Interrupts 9 (0, 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, A1 -or 16-, A2 - or 17) DC Current per I/O Pin 7 mA Flash Memory 256 KB Flash Memory for Bootloader 8 KB SRAM 32 KB EEPROM no Clock Speed 32.768 kHz (RTC), 48 MHz LED_BUILTIN 32 Full-Speed USB Device and embedded Host Documentation OSH: Schematics The MKR ZERO is open-source hardware! You can build your own board using the following files: EAGLE FILES IN .ZIPSCHEMATICS IN .PDF   Li-Po batteries, Pins, SD and board LEDs On-board SD   The on- board SD connector allows you to play with files without adding any extra hardware to the board. Furthermore SD card is driven by a dedicated SPI interface (SPI1) and so any of the pins of the header is busy during SD usage. The SD library automatically recognizes the MKR ZERO and so any modification to the sketch is needed to use it aprat from choosing the right SS pin (SDCARD_SS_PIN).    Battery capacity   Li-Po batteries are charged up to 4,2V with a current that is usually half of the nominal capacity (C/2). For Arduino MKR ZERO we use a specialized chip that has a preset charging current of 350mAh. This means that the MINIMUM capacity of the Li-Po battery should be 700 mAh. Smaller cells will be damaged by this current and may overheat, develop internal gasses and explode, setting on fire the surroundings. We strongly recommend that you select a Li-Po battery of at least 700mAh capacity. A bigger cell will take more time to charge, but won't be harmed or overheated. The chip is programmed with 4 hours of charging time, then it goes into automatic sleep mode. This will limit the amount of charge to max 1400 mAh per charging round.    Battery connector  If you want to connect a battery to your MKRZero be sure to search one with female 2 pin JST PHR2 Type connector.  Polarity : looking at the board connector pins, polarity is Left = Positive, Right = GND  Connector datasheet  On the MKRZero, connector is a Male 2pin JST PH Type    Additional I2C Port  The MKR Zero has an additional connector meant as an extension of the I2C bus. It's a small form factor 5-pin connector with 1.0mm pitch. The mechanical details of the connector can be found in the connector datasheet.  The I2C port in addition to the SDA and SCL signals includes the GND and +5V power rails and a digital pin that might be useful when designing an expansion.  The pinout is shown in the following image:  The connector we suggest for this additional I2C Port is the SHR-05V-S-B, also in the picture.  Vin  This pin can be used to power the board with a regulated 5V source. If the power is fed through this pin, the USB power source is disconnected. This is the only way you can supply 5v (range is 5V to maximum 6V) to the board not using USB. This pin is an INPUT.    5V  This pin outputs 5V from the the board when powered from the USB connector or from the VIN pin of the board. It is unregulated and the voltage is taken directly from the inputs. As an OUTPUT, it should not be used as an input pin to power the board.    VCC   This pin outputs 3.3V through the on-board voltage regulator. This voltage is the same regardless the power source used (USB, Vin and Battery).    LED ON  This LED is connected to the 5V input from either USB or VIN. It is not connected to the battery power. This means that it lits up when power is from USB or VIN, but stays off when the board is running on battery power. This maximizes the usage of the energy stored in the battery. It is therefore normal to have the board properly running on battery power without the LED ON being lit.    CHARGE LED  The CHARGE LED on the board is driven by the charger chip that monitors the current drawn by the Li-Po battery while charging. Usually it will lit up when the board gets 5V from VIN or USB and the chip starts charging the Li-Po battery connected to the JST connector.  There are several occasions where this LED will start to blink at a frequency of about 2Hz. This flashing is caused by the following conditions maintained for a long time (from 20 to 70 minutes): - No battery is connected to JST connector.  - Overdischarged/damaged battery is connected. It can't be recharged.  - A fully charged battery is put through another unnecessary charging cycle. This is done disconnecting and reconnecting either VIN or the battery itself while VIN is connected.    Onboard LED  On MKR ZERO the onboard LED is connected to a dedicated pin (32) and not to 13 as on other boards. It is so suggested to use the LED_BUILTIN define .  (*) Note : DO NOT CONNECT to the male JST connector present on the board anything else than a Li-Po battery whose characteristics are compliant with those indicated above. Please DO NOT POWER VIN with more than 5V.

₹2,409.00*
Arduino MKR1000 with Headers Mounted
  Arduino MKR1000 is a powerful board that combines the functionality of the Zero and the Wi-Fi Shield. It is the ideal solution for makers wanting to design IoT projects with minimal previous experience in networking. Arduino MKR1000 has been designed to offer a practical and cost effective solution for makers seeking to add Wi-Fi connectivity to their projects with minimal previous experience in networking.It is based on the Atmel ATSAMW25 SoC (System on Chip), that is part of the SmartConnect family of Atmel Wireless devices, specifically designed for IoT projects and devices. The ATSAMW25 is composed of three main blocks: SAMD21 Cortex-M0+ 32bit low power ARM MCU WINC1500 low power 2.4GHz IEEE® 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi ECC508 CryptoAuthentication The ATSAMW25 includes also a single 1x1 stream PCB Antenna. The design includes a Li-Po charging circuit that allows the Arduino/Genuino MKR1000 to run on battery power or external 5V, charging the Li-Po battery while running on external power. Switching from one source to the other is done automatically.A good 32 bit computational power similar to the Zero board, the usual rich set of I/O interfaces, low power Wi-Fi with a Cryptochip for secure communication, and the ease of use of the Arduino Software (IDE) for code development and programming. All these features make this board the preferred choice for the emerging IoT battery-powered projects in a compact form factor.The USB port can be used to supply power (5V) to the board.The Arduino MKR1000 is able to run with or without the Li-Po battery connected and has limited power consumption. The MKR1000 Wifi module supports certificate SHA-256. Warning: Unlike most Arduino & Genuino boards, the MKR1000 runs at 3.3V. The maximum voltage that the I/O pins can tolerate is 3.3V. Applying voltages higher than 3.3V to any I/O pin could damage the board. While output to 5V digital devices is possible, bidirectional communication with 5V devices needs proper level shifting. Technical Details:  Microcontroller SAMD21 Cortex-M0+ 32bit low power ARM MCU Board Power Supply (USB/VIN) 5V Supported Battery(*) Li-Po single cell, 3.7V, 700mAh minimum Circuit Operating Voltage 3.3V Digital I/O Pins 8 PWM Pins 12 (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, A3 - or 18 -, A4 -or 19) UART 1 SPI 1 I2C 1 Analog Input Pins 7 (ADC 8/10/12 bit) Analog Output Pins 1 (DAC 10 bit) External Interrupts 8 (0, 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, A1 -or 16-, A2 - or 17) DC Current per I/O Pin 7 mA Flash Memory 256 KB SRAM 32 KB EEPROM no Clock Speed 32.768 kHz (RTC), 48 MHz LED_BUILTIN 6 Full-Speed USB Device and embedded Host LED_BUILTIN 6 Lenght 61.5 mm Width 25 mm     Li-Po batteries, Pins and board LEDs Battery capacity Li-Po batteries are charged up to 4,2V with a current that is usually half of the nominal capacity (C/2). For Arduino / Genuino MKR1000 we use a specialized chip that has a preset charging current of 350mAh. This means that the MINIMUM capacity of the Li-Po battery should be 700 mAh. Smaller cells will be damaged by this current and may overheat, develop internal gasses and explode, setting on fire the surroundings. We strongly recommend that you select a Li-Po battery of at least 700mAh capacity. A bigger cell will take more time to charge, but won't be harmed or overheated. The chip is programmed with 4 hours of charging time, then it goes into automatic sleep mode. This will limit the amount of charge to max 1400 mAh per charging round. Battery connector If you want to connect a battery to your MKR1000 be sure to search one with female 2 pin JST PHR2 Type connector.Polarity : looking at the board connector pins, polarity is Left = Positive, Right = GNDDownload here the Connector datasheet. On the MKR1000, connector is a Male 2pin JST PH Type.VinThis pin can be used to power the board with a regulated 5V source. If the power is fed through this pin, the USB power source is disconnected. This is the only way you can supply 5v (range is 5V to maximum 6V) to the board not using USB. This pin is an INPUT.5VThis pin outputs 5V from the the board when powered from the USB connector or from the VIN pin of the board. It is unregulated and the voltage is taken directly from the inputs. When powered from battery it supplies around 3.7 V. As an OUTPUT, it should not be used as an input pin to power the board. VCC This pin outputs 3.3V through the on-board voltage regulator. This voltage is the same regardless the power source used (USB, Vin and Battery). LED ON This LED is connected to the 5V input from either USB or VIN. It is not connected to the battery power. This means that it lits up when power is from USB or VIN, but stays off when the board is running on battery power. This maximizes the usage of the energy stored in the battery. It is therefore normal to have the board properly running on battery power without the LED ON being lit. CHARGE LED The CHARGE LED on the board is driven by the charger chip that monitors the current drawn by the Li-Po battery while charging. Usually it will lit up when the board gets 5V from VIN or USB and the chip starts charging the Li-Po battery connected to the JST connector.There are several occasions where this LED will start to blink at a frequency of about 2Hz. This flashing is caused by the following conditions maintained for a long time (from 20 to 70 minutes):- No battery is connected to JST connector.- Overdischarged/damaged battery is connected. It can't be recharged.- A fully charged battery is put through another unnecessary charging cycle. This is done disconnecting and reconnecting either VIN or the battery itself while VIN is connected. Onboard LED On MKR1000 the onboard LED is connected to D6 and not D13 as on the other boards. Blink example or other sketcthes that uses pin 13 for onboard LED may need to be changed to work properly. (*) Note : DO NOT CONNECT to the male JST connector present on the board anything else than a Li-Po battery whose characteristics are compliant with those indicated above. Please DO NOT POWER VIN with more than 5V.  

₹3,959.00*
ARDUINO MOTOR SHIELD REV3
ARDUINO MOTOR SHIELD REV3
The Arduino Motor Shield allows your arduino to drive DC and stepper motors, relays and solenoids.   The Arduino Motor Shield is based on the L298 (datasheet), which is a dual full-bridge driver designed to drive inductive loads such as relays, solenoids, DC and stepping motors. It lets you drive two DC motors with your Arduino board, controlling the speed and direction of each one independently. You can also measure the motor current absorption of each motor, among other features. The shield is TinkerKit compatible, which means you can quickly create projects by plugging TinkerKit modules to the board.   Getting Started  You can find in the Getting Started section all the information you need to configure your board, use the Arduino Software (IDE), and start tinker with coding and electronics.   Specifications Operating Voltage 5V to 12V Motor controller L298P, Drives 2 DC motors or 1 stepper motor Max current 2A per channel or 4A max (with external power supply) Current sensing 1.65V/A Free running stop and brake function Documentation OSH: Schematics The Arduino Motor Shield is open-source hardware! You can build your own board using the following files:   EAGLE FILES IN .ZIPSCHEMATICS IN .PDF   Power The Arduino Motor Shield must be powered only by an external power supply. Because the L298 IC mounted on the shield has two separate power connections, one for the logic and one for the motor supply driver. The required motor current often exceeds the maximum USB current rating. External (non-USB) power can come either from an AC-to-DC adapter (wall-wart) or battery. The adapter can be connected by plugging a 2.1mm center-positive plug into the Arduino's board power jack on which the motor shield is mounted or by connecting the wires that lead the power supply to the Vin and GND screw terminals, taking care to respect the polarities. To avoid possible damage to the Arduino board on which the shield is mounted, we reccomend using an external power supply that provides a voltage between 7 and 12V. If your motor require more than 9V we recommend that you separate the power lines of the shield and the Arduino board on which the shield is mounted. This is possible by cutting the "Vin Connect" jumper placed on the back side of the shield. The absolute limit for the Vin at the screw terminals is 18V. The power pins are as follows: Vin on the screw terminal block, is the input voltage to the motor connected to the shield. An external power supply connected to this pin also provide power to the Arduino board on which is mounted. By cutting the "Vin Connect" jumper you make this a dedicated power line for the motor. GND Ground on the screw terminal block.   The shield can supply 2 amperes per channel, for a total of 4 amperes maximum.    Input and Output  This shield has two separate channels, called A and B, that each use 4 of the Arduino pins to drive or sense the motor. In total there are 8 pins in use on this shield. You can use each channel separately to drive two DC motors or combine them to drive one bipolar stepper motor. The shield's pins, divided by channel are shown in the table below:  Function pins per Ch. A pins per Ch. B Direction D12 D13 PWM D3 D11 Brake D9 D8 Current Sensing A0 A1 If you don't need the Brake and the Current Sensing and you also need more pins for your application you can disable this features by cutting the respective jumpers on the back side of the shield. The additional sockets on the shield are described as follow:  Screw terminal to connect the motors and their power supply. 2 TinkerKit connectors for two Analog Inputs (in white), connected to A2 and A3. 2 TinkerKit connectors for two Aanlog Outputs (in orange in the middle), connected to PWM outputs on pins D5 and D6. 2 TinkerKit connectors for the TWI interface (in white with 4 pins), one for input and the other one for output.   Motors Connection Brushed DC motor. You can drive two Brushed DC motors by connecting the two wires of each one in the (+) and (-) screw terminals for each channel A and B. In this way you can control its direction by setting HIGH or LOW the DIR A and DIR B pins, you can control the speed by varying the PWM A and PWM B duty cycle values. The Brake A and Brake B pins, if set HIGH, will effectively brake the DC motors rather than let them slow down by cutting the power. You can measure the current going through the DC motor by reading the SNS0 and SNS1 pins. On each channel will be a voltage proportional to the measured current, which can be read as a normal analog input, through the function analogRead() on the analog input A0 and A1. For your convenience it is calibrated to be 3.3V when the channel is delivering its maximum possible current, that is 2A.    Physical Characteristics The maximum length and width of the Motor Shield PCB are 2.7 and 2.1 inches respectively. Four screw holes allow the board to be attached to a surface or case. Note that the distance between digital pins 7 and 8 is 160 mil (0.16"), not an even multiple of the 100 mil spacing of the other pins.  

₹1,799.00*
ARDUINO NANO 33 BLE
ARDUINO NANO 33 BLE
Designed for short range BT interactions and power savvy projects.   This compact and reliable NANO board is built around the NINA B306 module, based on Nordic nRF 52840 and containing a powerful Cortex M4F.   Its architecture, fully compatible with Arduino IDE Online and Offline, has a 9 axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and a reduced power consumption compared to other same size boards.This allows the design of wearable devices and movement sensing projects that need to communicate to other devices at a close range. Arduino NANO 33 BLE is also ideal for automation projects thanks to the multiprotocol BT 5.0 radio.   This board is based on the nRF 52840 microcontroller. Clock 64MHz Flash 1MB RAM 256KB Please note: Arduino Nano 33 BLE only supports 3.3V I/Os and is NOT 5V tolerant so please make sure you are not directly connecting 5V signals to this board or it will be damaged. Also, as opposed to Arduino Nano boards that support 5V operation, the 5V pin does NOT supply voltage but is rather connected, through a jumper, to the USB power input.   The Bluetooth is managed by a NINA B306 module.   The IMU is a LSM9DS1 and it is managed through I2C.   The board has a two 15 pins connectors - one on each side -,  pin to pin compatible with the original Arduino Nano. Pin Funcion Type Description 1 D13/SCK Digital SPI SCK; GPIO 2 +3V3 Power Out Internally generated power output to external devices 3 AREF Analog Analog Reference; can be used as GPIO 4 A0 Analog ADC in; can be used as GPIO 5 A1 Analog ADC in; can be used as GPIO 6 A2 Analog ADC in; can be used as GPIO 7 A3 Analog ADC in; can be used as GPIO 8 A4/SDA Analog ADC in; I2C SDA; Can be used as GPIO (*) 9 A5/SCL Analog ADC in; I2C SCL; Can be used as GPIO(*) 10 A6 Analog ADC in; can be used as GPIO 11 A7 Analog ADC in; can be used as GPIO 12 VUSB  Power In/Out Normally NC; can be connected to VUSB pin of the USB connector by shorting a jumper 13 RST Digital In Active low reset input (duplicate of pin 18) 14 GND Power Power Ground 15 VIN Power In Vin Power input 16 TX Digital USART TX; can be used as GPIO 17 RX Digital USART RX; can be used as GPIO 18 RST Digital Active low reset input (duplicate of pin 13) 19 GND Power Power Ground 20 D2 Digital GPIO 21 D3/PWM Digital GPIO; can be used as PWM 22 D4 Digital GPIO 23 D5/PWM Digital GPIO; can be used as PWM 24 D6/PWM Digital GPIO; can be used as PWM 25 D7 Digital GPIO 26 D8 Digital GPIO 27 D9/PWM Digital GPIO; can be used as PWM 28 D10/PWM Digital GPIO; can be used as PWM 29 D11/MOSI Digital SPI MOSI; can be used as GPIO 30 D12/MISO Digital SPI MISO; can be used as GPIO (*) As opposed to other Arduino Nano boards, pins A4 and A5 have an internal pull up and default to be used as an I2C Bus so usage as analog inputs is not recommended. Opposed to Arduino Nano boards that support 5V operation, the 5V pin does NOT supply voltage but is rather connected, through a jumper, to the USB power input.   On the bottom side of the board, under the communication module, debug signals are arranged as 3x2 test pads with 100 mil pitch. Pin 1 is the bottom left one with the USB connector on the left and the test pads on the right. Pin Function Type Description 1 +3V3 Power Out Internally generated power output to be used as voltage reference 2 SWD Digital nRF52480 Single Wire Debug Data 3 SWCLK Digital In nRF52480 Single Wire Debug Clock 5 GND Power Power Ground 6 RST Digital In Active low reset input Documentation  OSH: Schematics The Arduino Nano 33 BLE is open-source hardware! Please note that this board is as the Arduino Nano 33 BLE Sense, but without the sensors. You can build your own board using the following files:  EAGLE FILES IN .ZIPSCHEMATICS IN .PDF   Note for Raspberry Pi users: the Linux Arm version of IDE with Mbed OS core 1.1.2  may show an error while compiling for this board. We are aware of the issue and we are updating the toolchain.  

₹2,299.00*
Arduino Nano 33 BLE Sense
Arduino Nano 33 BLE Sense
The Nano 33 BLE Sense (without headers) is Arduino’s 3.3V AI enabled board in the smallest available form factor: 45x18mm! The Arduino Nano 33 BLE Sense is a completely new board on a well-known form factor. It comes with a series of embedded sensors: 9 axis inertial sensor: what makes this board ideal for wearable devices humidity, and temperature sensor: to get highly accurate measurements of the environmental conditions barometric sensor: you could make a simple weather station microphone: to capture and analyse sound in real time gesture, proximity, light color and light intensity sensor : estimate the room’s luminosity, but also whether someone is moving close to the board The Arduino Nano 33 BLE Sense is an evolution of the traditional Arduino Nano, but featuring a lot more powerful processor, the nRF52840 from Nordic Semiconductors, a 32-bit ARM® Cortex™-M4 CPU running at 64 MHz. This will allow you to make larger programs than with the Arduino Uno (it has 1MB of program memory, 32 times bigger), and with a lot more variables (the RAM is 128 times bigger). The main processor includes other amazing features like Bluetooth® pairing via NFC and ultra low power consumption modes. Embedded Artificial Intelligence  The main feature of this board, besides the impressive selection of sensors, is the possibility of running Edge Computing applications (AI) on it using TinyML. You can create your machine learning models using TensorFlow™ Lite and upload them to your board using the Arduino IDE. Arduino’s developer Sandeep Mistry and Arduino’s advisor Dominic Pajak have prepared an introductory tutorial to AI on the Nano 33 BLE Sense, but also a more advanced guide on color detection. An Improved Arduino Nano If you used Arduino Nano in your projects in the past, the Nano 33 BLE Sense is a pin-equivalent substitute. Your code will still work, but remember, it operates at 3.3V. This means that you need to revise your original design in case it is not 3.3V compatible. Besides that, the main differences to the classic Nano are: a better processor, a micro-USB connector, and all of the sensors mentioned above. You can get the board with or without headers, what will allow you embedding the Nano inside any kind of inventions, including wearables. The board comes with tessellated connectors and no components on the B-side. These features allow you to solder the board directly onto your own design, minimizing the height of your whole prototype.  Bluetooth® and BLE  The communications chipset on the Nano 33 BLE Sense can be both a BLE and Bluetooth® client and host device. Something pretty unique in the world of microcontroller platforms. If you want to see how easy it is to create a Bluetooth® central or a peripheral device, explore the examples at our ArduinoBLE library. The Arduino Nano 33 BLE Sense is based on the nRF52840 microcontroller. Microcontroller nRF52840 (datasheet) Operating Voltage 3.3V Input Voltage (limit) 21V DC Current per I/O Pin 15 mA Clock Speed 64MHz CPU Flash Memory 1MB (nRF52840) SRAM 256KB (nRF52840) EEPROM none Digital Input / Output Pins 14 PWM Pins all digital pins UART 1 SPI 1 I2C 1 Analog Input Pins 8 (ADC 12 bit 200 ksamples) Analog Output Pins Only through PWM (no DAC) External Interrupts all digital pins LED_BUILTIN 13 USB Native in the nRF52840 Processor IMU LSM9DS1 (datasheet) Microphone MP34DT05 (datasheet) Gesture, light, proximity APDS9960 (datasheet) Barometric pressure LPS22HB (datasheet) Temperature, humidity HTS221 (datasheet) Length 45 mm Width 18 mm Weight 5 gr (with headers)

₹3,719.00*
Arduino Nano 33 BLE Sense with Headers
Arduino Nano 33 BLE Sense with Headers
The Nano 33 BLE Sense (with headers) is Arduino’s 3.3V AI enabled board in the smallest available form factor: 45x18mm!  The Arduino Nano 33 BLE Sense is a completely new board on a well-known form factor. It comes with a series of embedded sensors: 9 axis inertial sensor: what makes this board ideal for wearable devices humidity, and temperature sensor: to get highly accurate measurements of the environmental conditions barometric sensor: you could make a simple weather station microphone: to capture and analyse sound in real time gesture, proximity, light color and light intensity sensor : estimate the room’s luminosity, but also whether someone is moving close to the board   The Arduino Nano 33 BLE Sense is an evolution of the traditional Arduino Nano, but featuring a lot more powerful processor, the nRF52840 from Nordic Semiconductors, a 32-bit ARM® Cortex™-M4 CPU running at 64 MHz. This will allow you to make larger programs than with the Arduino Uno (it has 1MB of program memory, 32 times bigger), and with a lot more variables (the RAM is 128 times bigger). The main processor includes other amazing features like Bluetooth® pairing via NFC and ultra low power consumption modes. Embedded Artificial Intelligence  The main feature of this board, besides the impressive selection of sensors, is the possibility of running Edge Computing applications (AI) on it using TinyML. You can create your machine learning models using TensorFlow™ Lite and upload them to your board using the Arduino IDE.  Arduino’s developer Sandeep Mistry and Arduino’s advisor Dominic Pajak have prepared an introductory tutorial to AI on the Nano 33 BLE Sense, but also a more advanced guide on color detection.  An Improved Arduino Nano If you used Arduino Nano in your projects in the past, the Nano 33 BLE Sense is a pin-equivalent substitute. Your code will still work, but remember, it operates at 3.3V. This means that you need to revise your original design in case it is not 3.3V compatible. Besides that, the main differences to the classic Nano are: a better processor, a micro-USB connector, and all of the sensors mentioned above.  You can get the board with or without headers, what will allow you embedding the Nano inside any kind of inventions, including wearables. The board comes with tessellated connectors and no components on the B-side. These features allow you to solder the board directly onto your own design, minimizing the height of your whole prototype.  Bluetooth® and BLE The communications chipset on the Nano 33 BLE Sense can be both a BLE and Bluetooth® client and host device. Something pretty unique in the world of microcontroller platforms. If you want to see how easy it is to create a Bluetooth® central or a peripheral device, explore the examples at our ArduinoBLE library. The Arduino Nano 33 BLE Sense is based on the nRF52840 microcontroller. Microcontroller nRF52840 (datasheet) Operating Voltage 3.3V Input Voltage (limit) 21V DC Current per I/O Pin 15 mA Clock Speed 64MHz CPU Flash Memory 1MB (nRF52840) SRAM 256KB (nRF52840) EEPROM none Digital Input / Output Pins 14 PWM Pins all digital pins UART 1 SPI 1 I2C 1 Analog Input Pins 8 (ADC 12 bit 200 ksamples) Analog Output Pins Only through PWM (no DAC) External Interrupts all digital pins LED_BUILTIN 13 USB Native in the nRF52840 Processor IMU LSM9DS1 (datasheet) Microphone MP34DT05 (datasheet) Gesture, light, proximity APDS9960 (datasheet) Barometric pressure LPS22HB (datasheet) Temperature, humidity HTS221 (datasheet) Length 45 mm Width 18 mm Weight 5 gr (with headers) Pinout Diagram     Download the full pinout diagram as PDF here.

₹3,679.00*
Arduino Nano 33 BLE with Headers
Arduino Nano 33 BLE with Headers
The Nano 33 BLE (with headers) is Arduino’s 3.3V compatible board in the smallest available form factor: 45x18mm!  The Arduino Nano 33 BLE is a completely new board on a well-known form factor. It comes with an embedded 9 axis inertial sensor what makes this board ideal for wearable devices, but also for a large range of scientific experiments in the need of short-distance wireless communication.  The Arduino Nano 33 BLE is an evolution of the traditional Arduino Nano, but featuring a lot more powerful processor, the nRF52840 from Nordic Semiconductors, a 32-bit ARM® Cortex™-M4 CPU running at 64 MHz. This will allow you to make larger programs than with the Arduino Uno (it has 1MB of program memory, 32 times bigger), and with a lot more variables (the RAM is 128 times bigger). The main processor includes other amazing features like Bluetooth® pairing via NFC and ultra low power consumption modes. The Nano 33 BLE comes with a 9 axis inertial measurement unit (IMU) which means that it includes an accelerometer, a gyroscope, and a magnetometer with 3-axis resolution each. This makes the Nano 33 BLE the perfect choice for more advanced robotics experiments, exercise trackers, digital compasses, etc. An Improved Arduino Nano  If you used Arduino Nano in your projects in the past, the Nano 33 BLE is a pin-equivalent substitute. Your code will still work, but remember, it operates at 3.3V. This means that you need to revise your original design in case it is not 3.3V compatible. Besides that, the main differences to the classic Nano are: a better processor, a micro-USB connector, and a 9 axis IMU.  You can get the board with or without headers, what will allow you embedding the Nano inside any kind of inventions, including wearables. The board comes with tessellated connectors and no components on the B-side. These features allow you to solder the board directly onto your own design, minimizing the height of your whole prototype.  Bluetooth® and BLE  The communications chipset on the Nano 33 BLE can be both a BLE and Bluetooth® client and host device. Something pretty unique in the world of microcontroller platforms. If you want to see how easy it is to create a Bluetooth® central or a peripheral device, explore the examples at our ArduinoBLE library. The Arduino Nano 33 BLE is based on the nRF52840 microcontroller. Microcontroller nRF52840 (datasheet) Operating Voltage 3.3V Input Voltage (limit) 21V DC Current per I/O Pin 15 mA Clock Speed 64MHz CPU Flash Memory 1MB (nRF52840) SRAM 256KB (nRF52840) EEPROM none Digital Input / Output Pins 14 PWM Pins all digital pins UART 1 SPI 1 I2C 1 Analog Input Pins 8 (ADC 12 bit 200 ksamples) Analog Output Pins Only through PWM (no DAC) External Interrupts all digital pins LED_BUILTIN 13 USB Native in the nRF52840 Processor Length 45 mm Width 18 mm Weight 5 gr (with headers) Pinout Diagram  Download the full pinout diagram as PDF here. Download the Fritzing file here.

₹2,479.00*